Air Force

May 11, 2012

Air Force Specialty Code changes take effect in May

by Debbie Gildea
JB San Antonio-Randolph, Texas

Various officer and enlisted Air Force Specialty Code changes will take effect this month, Air Force Personnel Center officials said.

Updated Air Force officer and enlisted classification directories have been posted on the Air Force Personnel Services website. These updates include AFSC change summary and conversion guides reflecting the April 30 cycle and the latest details on approved Air Force specialties.

Classification changes within a conversion cycle vary from minor text corrections to establishment of a new AFSC or AFSC suffix said Barry Craigen, AFPC Military Classification Development Branch Chief. A cycle may also include creation or modification of special experience identifiers.

While conversion cycles have been implemented and announced quarterly, Craigen said, starting Oct. 31, conversion announcements will be semiannual, Oct. 31 and April 30.

According to Craigen, one example of a classification change occurs when an AFSC is created or modified, including adding suffixes to more specifically identify the work actually being performed.

“For example, the enlisted network intelligence analyst AFSC is 1N4X1. Effective May 1, the AFSC will split into 1N4X1A, fusion analyst, digital network analyst, and 1N4X1B fusion analyst, analysis and production. The Airmen involved will be converted to the appropriate suffix,” he said.

One special duty identifier update this cycle is to professional military education instructor entrance and retention requirements which were extensively revised, explained Craigen.

“This is one of a number of changes announced in the change summary and conversion guide, which will be included in Attachment 1 of the April 30 enlisted classification directory,” Craigen said.

Classification changes also occur when an AFSC is deleted, created, or transitions to a new number because the prior AFSC no longer meets the needs of the functional community, he explained. For example, in January, changes occurred in the 2A3X1 enlisted avionics systems AFSC.

The change was necessary to provide aircraft-specific suffixes at the 5-skill level and rename the AFSC. The new AFSC will be 2A3X4, Fighter Aircraft Integrated Avionics. Suffixes identify the aircraft serviced, including the CV-22 avionics systems, Craigen explained.

“Developing and maintaining clearly written classification qualifications and standards is critical,” Craigen said. “Clear, measurable standards and qualifications enable us to accurately, objectively establish manpower positions within units and determine qualifications for Airmen.”

For more information about career field changes visit the Air Force Personnel Services website at https://gum-crm.csd.disa.mil and search for classification directory.




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