Air Force

March 22, 2013

AFOSR shares results from Annual Spring Review

The Program Officers of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research completed their 56th annual Spring Review, which ran from 4 March through 8 March in Arlington, Va

This annual assessment of AFOSR’s research portfolio highlighted not only the overall research portfolio, but emphasized the numerous basic research transitions of benefit to the United States Air Force.

In attendance were senior members of the organization as well as an online audience of over 1,200 attendees from other Air Force laboratories, universities and industry, many of whom would have been unable to travel to the event person. Interested participants were also able to download copies of the presentations and did so nearly 5,000 times during the week.

This is the third year that AFOSR has opened this annual event to the broad public by opting to stream it online, a decision that has helped improve the communication flow and transparency of a small organization with a big mission for the United States Air Force.

Since its establishment in 1951, AFOSR has been responsible for investing in extramural basic research programs at leading universities and in-house (intramural) Air Force laboratories. During the first five years of AFOSR’s existence, the annual budget was relatively lean (as was the staff–between 20 to 27 personnel).

It was then that history intervened when the Soviet Union launched Sputnik, the first earth satellite, in October 1957. Almost overnight, AFOSR’s budget almost doubled, and with it, a gradual boost in personnel. Sputnik was a major wake-up call regarding the overwhelming importance of science and technology to the future security, as well as economic vitality, of the United States.

For several decades thereafter, AFOSR held not only a Spring Review, but a Fall Review as well. By 1975, AFOSR was responsible for all Air Force basic research funding, and the bi-annual reviews continued to provide a formal review of the status and areas of emphasis in the overall basic research portfolio.

Although AFOSR reverted to an annual review in the 1990’s, this management tool continues to provide an excellent opportunity for both an introspective self-examination of a wide-ranging research portfolio as well as welcoming the views of customers and stakeholders in the continuous pursuit of cutting edge research that forges the foundation of our future Air Force.

For those who missed the 2013 Spring Review, presentations and video recordings for each Program Officer are still available for download here




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
web_LM-AEHF

Fourth AEHF protected communications satellite begins integration months ahead of schedule

The fourth Advanced Extremely High Frequency satellite produced by Lockheed Martin is taking shape after early deliveries of its payload and propulsion core. AEHF-4, expected to launch in 2017, will enable the constellation to ...
 
 
Lockheed Martin photograph

Lockheed Martin GPS III successfully communicates With GPS constellation

Lockheed Martin photograph Lockheed Martin’s GPS III Non-Flight Satellite Testbed, a full-sized, functional GPS III satellite prototype, now at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., recently communicated via cross-links...
 
 
WEB_nano-satellites

Small satellites on a BIG Mission: Air Force launches high-tech NanoSats

In its 60 year history, the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center has successfully launched some of the largest and most sophisticated satellites ever created. On Nov. 19 at 8:15 p.m., EST, SMC charted a new trajectory by ...
 

 

Next Boeing GPS IIF satellite arrives at Cape Canaveral for launch

Boeing workers lift the Global Positioning System IIF-5 satellite onto a transporter following its Aug. 1 arrival at the Navstar Processing Facility on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Boeing shipped the fifth GPS IIF satellite from its satellite factory in El Segundo, Calif., on a U.S. Air Force C-17 airlifter. Workers will fuel the...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Pat Corkery

Air Force launches third AEHF satellite

Air Force photograph by Pat Corkery A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying the third Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF-3) satellite for the United States Air Force lifted off from Space Launch Complex-41 here at...
 
 

U.S., allies increase protected military satellite comm capability with AEHF launch

The third Advanced Extremely High Frequency military communication satellite, built by a Lockheed Martin team for the U.S. Air Force, was successfully launched at 4:10 a.m., Sept. 18, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. Lockheed Martin confirmed signal acquisition at 51 minutes after launch. The AEHF system...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin