Health & Safety

March 31, 2012

ASTS receives life-like training tool

by Staff Sgt. Denise Willhite
944th Fighter Wing Public Affairs
Staff Sgt. Louis Vega Jr.
Staff Sgt. Jason Good, 944th Aeromedical Staging Squadron, gives a demo on the new state-of-the-art SimMan 3G. The SimMan will help sustain training for both the 944th Medical Squadron and ASTS.

The newest member of the 944th Aeromedical Staging Squadron allows operators to create “real-life” situations for medical training.

Laerdal SimMan 3G, a new mannequin, is a life-like patient able to produce audible breathing and bowel sounds, and heartbeats. He can sweat, cry and bleed. Even more surprising, the wireless mannequin can talk.

“Our students can interact in an honest forum with the feeling that they are treating a ‘real’ person,” said Lt. Col. Cookie Avvampato, 944th ASTS clinical nurse.

“The SimMan software can create a vast array of medical situations allowing our Airmen to learn and practice in a realistic setting,” she said.

The SimMan creates an environment where multiple emergencies can be replicated at once, allowing responders to practice on a “person” instead of simulating responses. This allows for better hands-on-training and recreates real life situations. As a result, medical team members are better prepared field technicians.

Depending on the objective, a scenario is loaded and trainees have to evaluate and care for SimMan appropriately. SimMan is programmed to react to care provided and can actually “die” if not given the proper care. This creates optimal training, allowing trainees to see the consequences of their actions during the scenario. Instructors can also load different scenarios midway through a session to ensure training objectives are met.

“Being able to feel a pulse, hear breath or bowel sounds is a great asset for a new learner rather than listening to a tape and using their imaginations,” said Senior Master Sgt. Sandra Ross, 944th ASTS Joint Medical Operations training director.

“The realism of the SimMan allows med techs, doctors and nurses to do more advanced procedures. His six-hour battery life, gives us more freedom to develop scenarios that meet training objectives,” Ross said.

SimMan is expected to reduce costs by reducing temporary duty assignments required for training. In addition, the state-of-the-art device will benefit more than just reservists at Luke Air Force Base, according to Amvvampato.

“As we move forward with our simulation center, we hope to build a benchmark program that will accommodate not only reservists but our active-duty counterparts and community as well,” she said.




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