Commentary

April 27, 2012

NCO squanders six-figure nest egg

by Lt. Col. Charles DeLapp
56th Training Squadron
Pg-2-DeLapp
DeLapp

It sounds almost unbelievable, and I hope the headline grabs your attention, but unfortunately it is true.

I, and many of my fellow squadron commanders, have had the responsibility of informing NCOs that not only would they be out of work, but they have also lost the opportunity to collect a $2000-plus per month retirement check. Their retirement would have paid them in excess of $650,000 over the rest of their lives. Instead, they will receive zero retirement pay and will have the same retirement benefits that are offered to Airmen who serve as little as one honorable term of enlistment. These NCOs will receive no additional benefits for the countless TDYs, remote tours, deployments and long hours they honorably served.

How did this happen? You may be thinking that they got caught using drugs or were in violation of another portion of the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Perhaps they were separated following poor performance reports and an inability to advance in rank. Neither of these were the case. In fact, no crime was committed and their Air Force careers were cut short for failure to meet the U.S. Air Force fitness standards as outlined in AFI 36-2905.

Unfortunately, these numbers are rising. This year alone, the 56th Fighter Wing has initiated or completed discharge actions for eight NCOs for physical training test failure at least four times in a 24-month time period. While this may seem harsh, the rules are clearly spelled out in the AFI. The bottom-line is that the Air Force PT test is not hard, but it is a test you cannot cram for the night before.

From my experience, this is where most Airmen have difficulty. Working out hard during the week leading up to the test won’t guarantee you pass. Instead, success on the PT test hinges on a solid sustained physical fitness program. Too many Airmen are only on the track twice a year — for their semiannual test. This technique may work when you are 22 years old, but I can almost guarantee it will not work when you are 32 or 42 years old. From my experience, this is where we are seeing increases in PT failures and ultimately separations resulting from PT issues.

What will work is a disciplined training program that replicates what you will be tested on; crunches, push-ups, and the 1.5-mile run. You must know what you need to score for gender and age categories. Finally, I would recommend accomplishing periodic mock tests that string the three physical portions fairly close together, with the help of a unit PT leader. Remember, just because you can run four miles a day does not mean you can pass the PT test. When in doubt, seek the advice of the fitness professionals at the 56th Force Support Squadron Health and Wellness Center and fitness center.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Samuel Price

RMO, stakeholders keep eye on sky

Samuel Price The road used to get onto the Barry M. Goldwater Range lies beneath the running water July 9, 2014, that resulted from monsoon rains. With data from the additional recently installed weather stations, personnel wil...
 
 

Resource management — Doing more with less

Since I joined the Air Force in 1992, our manpower and resources have been gradually reduced with no obvious change to the mission we support. While this has been labeled “doing more with less,” I don’t believe we’re truly doing any more than we did when I entered the military 22 years ago. We seem...
 
 

Situational awareness

Throughout my career, the importance of situational awareness has been driven into my head. This became exceedingly clear to me when I landed in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia. It was March 17, 2003, about 48 hours until Operation Iraqi Freedom kicked off. We were busy building tents, making bunkers and preparing to execute the mission. Doing...
 

 

Air Force OSI agents prevent online exploitation of children

QUANTICO, Va. — Child sex crimes are not unique to any particular base but are a perpetual problem across the Air Force and society. Online exploitation of children continues to be a problem and is routinely investigated by the Air Force Office of Special Investigations. As part of this effort, AFOSI field units have partnered...
 
 

News Briefs February 27, 2015

MDG appointment line upgrade Patients calling the 56th Medical Group at 623-856-2273 Wednesday afternoon to schedule an appointment may reach a busy signal and may have to call back if all booking agents are on the line with other callers. The queue function allowing patients to wait on hold for the next available booking agent...
 
 

Airmen get T-bolts to give blood, win award

Tech. Sgt. Alisa Frisch, 56th Medical Group unit training manager, and Capt. Sharlott Uriarte, 56th Medical Support Squadron, were among the top 3 percent of award-winning blood drive coordinators recently honored by United Blood Services, earning a Hero Award for providing the largest impact on the blood supply. Of the 1,080 organizations that sponsored blood...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin