Health & Safety

June 22, 2012

Luke 1 speaks out on DUI

Tags:
by Capt. Tristan Hinderliter
56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Brig. Gen. JD Harris, 56th Fighter Wing commander, his wife, Heather, and their sons John, left, and Doug are pictured here in front of the Taj Mahal in India in June 2006. Harris was stationed in New Delhi at the time attending National Defence College.

In November 2006, Brig. Gen. JD Harris, 56th Fighter Wing commander (a colonel at the time), was attending National Defence College in New Delhi, India, accompanied by his wife, Heather, and son, John.

Meanwhile in South Carolina, their oldest son, Jerry Douglas Harris III, who went by “Doug,” was a freshman at Clemson University. He was studying mechanical engineering and was a cadet in the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps program.

Their family had lived in the state from 2001 to 2005, when Harris was stationed at Shaw AFB, and having gone to high school there, Doug decided he wanted to call South Carolina home.

One day in mid-November, the dining facility on campus was closed for a school break, so being a broke college student, Doug went to the store for a loaf of bread, jelly and peanut butter. Then, realizing it was his girlfriend’s birthday, he went out and bought her a small gift and took her out on a picnic lunch with PB&J sandwiches.

Later that day, he and his girlfriend went bowling with a group of friends, and at about midnight Doug dropped her off at her house. About a quarter of a mile down the road on his way back to Clemson, Doug was hit in a head-on collision by a drunk driver and was killed on impact. He was 18 years old. It was Nov. 11, Veterans Day.

Jerry Douglas Harris III, who went by Doug, the son of Brig. Gen. JD Harris, 56th Fighter Wing commander, is pictured here preparing to fly as an Air Force ROTC cadet at Clemson University, South Carolina, in September 2006. Two months later, he was killed by a drunk driver in an automobile accident.

“He was just a really nice young man and had hoped to follow in my footsteps,” Harris said of his son.  “It’s a poignant reminder for us of the consequences of drinking and driving.”

The man behind the wheel of the other vehicle, a 37-year-old father of two, was injured but survived the accident. His blood alcohol level was .24, three times the legal limit in South Carolina. Since it was his first offense, he spent a couple of nights in jail, but that was about it.

Given the general’s personal experience, it’s no surprise that DUI prevention is his top priority for the wing when it comes to taking care of Airmen.

“The mission comes first, and we have to be able to get it done,” Harris said. “When we have an Airman who gets in trouble with an alcohol-related incident, that affects his or her ability to get the job done.”

A DUI can have terrible consequences for an Airman’s career, he said.

“You get promoted based on your potential, but if your potential is crushed because you have an alcohol-related incident on your record, that will hurt your chances of promotion,” the general said. “If you’re waiting to sew on a stripe or pin on another bar, quite often the unit commander will red line you for that promotion. I’ve seen that for both officers and enlisted.”

DUI also affects an Airman’s personal life, Harris said. An Airman convicted of driving under the influence will lose their driving privileges on base for a year and face consequences from civil authorities off-base.

Additionally, the financial fallout can be crippling. Car insurance premiums will go through the roof, and lawyer fees can run into the thousands of dollars. A conviction may result in two years or more worth of lower pay for lost rank or a delayed promotion.

Then there is the stigma associated with DUI.

“Everybody else knows that you were out drinking and driving,” Harris said. “Under most circumstances, you spent a night in jail. Your first sergeant had to come bail you out, or maybe a family member. Other people have been counting on you, and now you’re counting on them, so it’s not an easy thing for anybody.”

Fortunately, there are resources to help Airmen with alternatives to drinking and driving. The base has a robust Airmen Against Drunk Driving program, which provides a free ride home if all other options have been exhausted. That service can be reached at (623) 856-AADD.

“It’s always worth taking a taxi home,” Harris said. “The $25 you think you don’t have is nothing compared to the thousands of dollars it would cost you for a DUI.”

Even worse, you could kill or injure yourself or someone else.

“I expect people to go out and have a good time, but you have to do it in moderation, because you’re always an Airman,” Harris said. “My recommendation is to just be responsible about it, and have a plan.”

 

Critical Days of Summer: DUI prevention

 

By the numbers

  • $51 billon: the annual cost of alcohol-related crashes
  • 1.4 million drivers were arrested for DUI in 2009
  • 10,000-plus people will die in an alcohol-impaired driving crash this year
  • 80: the average number of times a person has driven drunk before getting caught
  • 1 death occurs every 48 minutes due to drunk driving

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

Fact:

Luke Air Force Base members aren’t exempt from DUIs. Since January 2011, at least 30 Airmen have been charged with a DUI.

Source: Randy Felciano, 56th Security Forces Squadron reports and analysis chief

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Courtesy graphic

Fitness center gets Xtreme makeover

Courtesy graphic Above is an architectural rendering of the changes to the outside of the Luke Air Force Base Bryant Fitness Center. Renovations also include a remodel of most of the interior. The project will take place over t...
 
 

People — Air Force’s greatest asset

As I reflect on almost 25 years of military service, I find it easy to remember my assignments, the multiple jobs I’ve had and duties I have performed. I have served on four continents and for four presidents. Within that same time period, our nation has been in numerous campaigns ranging from operations Desert Storm...
 
 

Character, good or bad, will be passed on

Your character is who you are when no one is watching. At the same time, your character is who you are when everyone is watching. Your character is the sum of your morals and values and the quality of your character is of the utmost importance when leading others. In addition to your own values...
 

 
Senior Airman 
JAMES HENSLEY

History gets paint job

Senior AirmanJAMES HENSLEY James Bridges and Hayden Yager, civilian contractors, prepare the F-104C Starfighter static display for painting Aug. 12 in the Luke Air Force Base Airpark. The static displays in the airpark will be ...
 
 

News Briefs August 29, 2015

Base-wide exercise The 56th Fighter Wing will begin an active-shooter exercise between 8 and 10 a.m. Thursday. It is expected to continue throughout the day. The exercise will include military and local, county and state law enforcement, and fire departments. On and off-base residents should expect traffic disruptions, gate closures or delays, and interruption of...
 
 
Tech. Sgt. 
BARBARA PLANTE

944th Airmen live life as military couple

Tech. Sgt.BARBARA PLANTE Staff Sgt. Adam Jenkins and Senior Airman Cassandra Jenkins, 944th Logistics Readiness Squadron, are a dual-military couple and work together as maintainers in the refueling vehicle maintenance shop. St...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>