Health & Safety

June 29, 2012

Resources available at Luke for domestic abuse prevention

Tags:
by Airman 1st Class Grace Lee
56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Domestic abuse is a problem that can affect many families, including military families. According to the Defense Department Family Advocacy Program report, victims of domestic abuse include both men and women. In fact, one in four women are or will be victims, and 15 percent of reports involve male victims.

According to Maj. Corey Christopherson, 56th Medical Operations Squadron Behavioral Health Flight commander, domestic abuse has many forms and is not just limited to obvious physical violence. It may include physical aggression or assault, threats, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, isolation, stalking, economic deprivation and violation of a lawful order issued to a victim for protection.

Domestic abuse may involve someone who is a current or former spouse of an abuser, a person with whom the abuser shares a child in common, a current or former intimate partner with whom the abuser shares or has shared a common residence.

While domestic abuse encompasses all forms of abuse, domestic violence refers to physical acts of abuse.

Some examples of domestic violence include physical aggression or assault (hitting, kicking, biting, shoving, restraining, slapping, throwing objects); it also includes sexual abuse and emotional abuse.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, children exposed to domestic violence have a greater chance of exhibiting signs of aggressive behavior, such as bullying, and are up to three times more likely to be involved in fighting.

In one particular case, Audrey Mabrey, whose story was published in The Tampa Bay Times, was a child who saw her mother endure abuse at the hands of her father and became a victim herself as her brother imitated the behavior.

As an adult, Mabrey went through two abusive relationships. The most recent one ended violently in 2009. Her husband, Christopher Hanney, beat her, soaked her in gasoline and then lit her with a candle causing severe burns to her body.

Although Mabrey has endured so much, she is still determined to turn her tribulation into a positive by helping others to recognize signs of abuse.

“It is oftentimes a silent issue, so it is important to encourage other women to not only get out of it (the abusive relationship) but to advocate,” Mabrey was quoted as saying in the article.

When Mabrey looks back at her courtship and marriage with Hanney, she now sees the signs and red flags she learned about during counseling.

For those who may be in abusive relationships, knowing the signs is very important to their safety and well being.

“Know the red flags,” said Crystal Lewis Brown, army.mil writer. “Abuse may not always begin as physical abuse.”

Examples include using coercion and threats, intimidation, isolation (controlling access to military I.D. card, family and friends), using children (refusing to help with the children, threatening to hurt them), and denying and blaming.

“Even though it may seem to the victim there aren’t a lot of options available, there are,” Christopherson said. “The victim has the right to receive support from a victim advocate at any time.

“The Luke Air Force Base Family Advocacy Program offers domestic abuse victim advocates who are trained professionals to provide non-clinical advocacy services to domestic abuse victims.”

Victim advocates provide services including crisis intervention, coordinating emergency services, transportation, shelter, food, safety assessment and planning.

For victims who wish to make a restricted report, which is confidential in accordance with Air Force policy, they can do so through the domestic abuse victim advocate, a medical care provider or the family advocacy center. Only military members can make restricted reports. For more information on restricted reporting and other available options of reporting, call the DAVA.

According to Christopherson, the on-call DAVA will help victims to make informed and independent decisions.

In support of victims who are in immediate need, the DAVA has an emergency phone line open around the clock at (623) 255-3487. In case of a life-threatening emergency, call 911.

For more information on safety plans and other resources, check out the Arizona Coalition Against Domestic Violence website at azcadv.org.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Samuel Price

RMO, stakeholders keep eye on sky

Samuel Price The road used to get onto the Barry M. Goldwater Range lies beneath the running water July 9, 2014, that resulted from monsoon rains. With data from the additional recently installed weather stations, personnel wil...
 
 

Resource management — Doing more with less

Since I joined the Air Force in 1992, our manpower and resources have been gradually reduced with no obvious change to the mission we support. While this has been labeled “doing more with less,” I don’t believe we’re truly doing any more than we did when I entered the military 22 years ago. We seem...
 
 

Situational awareness

Throughout my career, the importance of situational awareness has been driven into my head. This became exceedingly clear to me when I landed in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia. It was March 17, 2003, about 48 hours until Operation Iraqi Freedom kicked off. We were busy building tents, making bunkers and preparing to execute the mission. Doing...
 

 

Air Force OSI agents prevent online exploitation of children

QUANTICO, Va. — Child sex crimes are not unique to any particular base but are a perpetual problem across the Air Force and society. Online exploitation of children continues to be a problem and is routinely investigated by the Air Force Office of Special Investigations. As part of this effort, AFOSI field units have partnered...
 
 

News Briefs February 27, 2015

MDG appointment line upgrade Patients calling the 56th Medical Group at 623-856-2273 Wednesday afternoon to schedule an appointment may reach a busy signal and may have to call back if all booking agents are on the line with other callers. The queue function allowing patients to wait on hold for the next available booking agent...
 
 

Airmen get T-bolts to give blood, win award

Tech. Sgt. Alisa Frisch, 56th Medical Group unit training manager, and Capt. Sharlott Uriarte, 56th Medical Support Squadron, were among the top 3 percent of award-winning blood drive coordinators recently honored by United Blood Services, earning a Hero Award for providing the largest impact on the blood supply. Of the 1,080 organizations that sponsored blood...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin