Health & Safety

August 17, 2012

It’s not all about cardio

Tags:
by Airman 1st Class GRACE LEE
56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Senior Airman Michael Emerson, 56th Operations Support Squadron Air Traffic Control, works out at the Bryant Fitness Center Tuesday on Luke Air Force Base. Although cardio is an effective way to burn fat and calories, a toned body isn’t accomplished only by spending hours on the treadmill or track. Strength training is equally important. Strength training reduces body fat, increases lean muscle mass, helps develop strong bones and boosts stamina.

When one thinks about getting a fit, toned body what comes to mind may be spending countless hours on the treadmill or track, since it’s said that cardio is the most effective way to burn fat and calories. But what one may not know is strength training is equally important.

“Strength training reduces body fat, increases lean muscle mass, helps develop strong bones and boosts stamina,” said Simeon Maxwell, 56th Force Support Squadron Fitness Center personal trainer.

As well as making the body stronger, strength training also helps one with accomplishing daily tasks, said Pernell Stoney, 56th FSS Fitness Center sports and fitness manager.

“Once you begin getting stronger, strength training helps with daily movements such as lifting, carrying, pushing and pulling,” he said. “That is why strength training is essential. It also prevents injury while lifting or walking.”

While strength training carries many benefits, there may be some people, generally women, who are afraid that lifting weights could result in a ‘bulkier’ figure, but according to Maxwell that is a myth.

“If one wants to bulk up, lift heavy weights doing four to six repetitions per set, this is known as power lifting,” he said. “On the other hand, using weight that can be lifted at 15 to 20 repetitions per set will help tone and sculpt the body. Women shouldn’t be afraid to lift since they do not have enough testosterone to bulk up.”

Strength training may be intimidating, but for beginners, Maxwell recommends starting on fixed weight equipment such as the Nautilus to develop strength and coordination before moving on to free weights.

For beginners, it may seem like strength training is just a matter of lifting, but there are some frequent errors that can be made while lifting.

“A few common mistakes made are lifting too much weight, not using the full range of motion, using weight that is too light, not working all the muscle groups, doing too many isolated exercises, using improper form and lastly not adding a slight pause in between reps,” he said.

As it’s important to make sure proper form is used while lifting, it’s just as essential to change up your workout, Maxwell said.

“Set goals, change your routine every four weeks, make the routines challenging, don’t rush through repetitions, and every now and then give your muscles time to heal,” he said. “Exercise is vital to maintaining a healthy lifestyle, promoting fitness and staying in shape. Check with your doctor before starting any exercise program.”

For those who want to improve their strength there are classes available at Luke Air Force Base.

“We have a class called Warrior Fitness Training, which happens five days a week,” Stoney said. “There are six classes ranging from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information or to sign up call the Combat PT Center at (623) 856-2291.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Courtesy Photo

Airman leaves AF to pursue college B-ball career

Courtesy Photo Senior Airman Patrick Paul, 56th Logistics Readiness Squadron, shoots a jump shot during a game against the 56th Security Forces Squadron at the Bryant Fitness Center. Paul is finishing out his Air Force commitme...
 
 
140307-F-CB366-007

Airmen shave heads for pilot’s son battling cancer

Senior Airman David Owsianka Airmen from the 62nd Fighter Squadron recently shaved their heads to support a deceased officer’s son who is battling with cancer. Second Lt. Dave Mitchell, former 62nd FS pilot, lost his life dur...
 
 

Three steps to avoid ‘toxic leadership’

Toxic leadership. Sadly, this term has recently become vogue in the lexicon of the Defense Department to describe leaders possessing unfavorable leadership characteristics and whose actions eventually rot an organization from the inside out. Examples of these leaders drape across the weekly headlines and sound bites of newspapers, radio and television. “Leaders” who become drunk...
 

 

Personal improvement, goal setting all part of leadership

In preparation for the changes in regard to officer and enlisted performance reports, and force management issues, it is important to reflect on personal improvement and goal setting. This topic is close to my heart and revolves around leadership. As officers, leaders and mentors, we can all benefit from refreshing our vigilance and attention to...
 
 
Courtesy photo

Instructor pilot selected as Olmsted scholar

Courtesy photo Capt. Daniel Wynn, 56th Operations Support Squadron operations flight commander, prepares to refuel in an F-16 Fighting Falcon during a combat mission over Afghanistan in August 2011. For many U.S. military membe...
 
 

News Briefs April 11, 2013

Base-wide exercise The 56th Fighter Wing will conduct a natural disaster exercise today, which will include military, local, county and state law enforcement, and fire departments. Those traveling on base should expect traffic disruptions, gate closures or delays, and interruptions of customer service operations. Expect to see simulated explosions, smoke, role players depicting individuals with...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin