Air Force

September 7, 2012

F-16 pilot reaches flying hour milestone

Tags:
Staff Sgt. DARLENE SELTMANN

Maj. Frank Bricel, 69th Fighter Squadron assistant director of operations, prepares to exit his aircraft Aug. 31 after crossing his 3,000 flying hour mark in an F-16 Fighting Falcon at Luke Air Force Base. Bricel has been flying for 18 years.

On a scorching afternoon in the skies over Luke Air Force Base, one F- 16 pilot reached a milestone few can claim in their careers.

Maj. Frank Bricel, 69th Fighter Squadron assistant director of operations, reached his 3,000th flying hour Aug. 31 after 18 years of flying.

Bricel grew up in an Air Force family, and after watching and listening to the F-4s and F-105s on the base where his father was stationed, he knew by the 4th grade what he wanted to be when he grew up – a fighter pilot.

“It was the only career path I focused on,” he said. “I went through Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps at Southern Illinois (University) and received my pilot’s slot at the end of my freshman year. Needless to say, my career was focused toward that goal.”

Bricel began his pilot training at Vance Air Force Base, Okla., and has been at Luke AFB since 1996. He spent three years active duty, got out and spent the next five years flying for a commercial airline. He joined the Reserve in 2004 and has been flying with them ever since. He is a full-time reservist in the 69th FS but flies out of the 62nd FS.

His most memorable mission was supporting Marines against Syrian freedom fighters in 2005 near the Iraq and Syrian border.

“I was tasked to destroy the enemy that was shooting at the Marines and did so with one joint direct attack munition and one laser-guided bomb,” Bricel said. “Both bombs were direct hits and the mission was a huge success.”

Bricel’s accomplishment does not go unnoticed in the close-knit pilot community.

“It’s a tremendous accomplishment – only 233 F-16 pilots have ever reached that honor,” said Lt. Col. Bob Whitehouse, 69th FS commander. “It typifies the professionalism, airmanship and experience that Bricel and the 69th FS bring to the total force integration at Luke.”

Bricel credits his success to the support of his father, retired Senior Master Sgt. Frank Bricel.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
NEW_1

Luke F-35s visit Columbus AFB

Airman 1st Class Daniel Lile A T-6 Texan II roars overhead as the pilots of two Luke Air Force Base F-35 Lightning IIs prepare to exit their aircraft July 23 at Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi. The pilots are Capt. Nichola...
 
 

Gillespie Loop: Honors Airman who made ultimate sacrifice

BAGRAM AIR FIELD, Afghanistan — The men and women of the 455th Air Expeditionary Wing came together for a road dedication ceremony to honor Master Sgt. Randy Gillespie, a fallen Airman who paid the ultimate sacrifice. Master Sgt. Randy Gillespie was a career fuels specialist who died July 9, 2007, from wounds sustained during small...
 
 

Who’s afraid of a little blood?

I have been in the Air Force for 22 years and have been a medical laboratory technician since the beginning of my career. The medical or clinical laboratory is where specimens are tested to provide information to medical providers who directly assist in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease in patients. After graduating basic...
 

 

Pursue education for career’s sake

Everyone knows education can be a good bullet on an enlisted performance report, but few know the true value of an education in regard to a military career. The pursuit of an education can be just as valuable as the degree acquired at the end. The knowledge acquired in the pursuit of an education can...
 
 
Pg-3--photo-illustration

Candid money talk improves relationship

There are many reasons why people divorce but at the top of the list are lack of communication and finances. That’s why it’s important to combine these two topics to make for a successful long-lasting relationship. “I bel...
 
 

News Briefs July 31, 2015

Total body conditioning class A new total body conditioning class is 6:30 and 9 a.m. Monday and Wednesday. The 6:30 a.m. class is broken into two half hour segments to accommodate squadron or individual physical training. The 9 a.m. class is one hour. The class consists of body weight movements and the use of equipment...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>