Local

September 7, 2012

Heat, grime combine for the dirtiest jobs

Airman 1st Class Logan Wygal, 56th Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle mechanic, washes a MB-4 tow tractor at the wash rack.

There are many types of jobs at Luke Air Force Base, from office jobs to veterinary services. Many of the jobs that keep Luke running can get a person pretty dirty, but someone has to do them.

Every day we hear the “sound of freedom” overhead. But who are the ones that keep the jets up, running and lethal in order to complete the mission of training the world’s greatest F-16 fighter pilots and maintainers? The 56th Maintenance Group maintainers, which includes crew chiefs, jet engine mechanics, aircraft armament system technicians, munitions system technicians, aerospace ground equipment technicians and countless others combine to get the job done. They deal with the everyday upkeep, building and loading of munitions, and caring for the equipment on the ground, sometimes very dirty jobs.

The maintainers keep the jets serviced but the 56th Logistics Readiness Squadron Petroleum, Oil and Lubricant Flight keeps them fueled. POL not only keeps the jets fueled but also deals with receiving, transferring and storing petroleum products on base. The dirtiest part of their job is keeping their vehicles serviced, which the majority of the work they do themselves.

Senior Airman Thomas Batzer, 309th Aircraft Maintenance Unit crew chief, drains hydraulic fluid in order to change the shock strut on an F-16 Fighting Falcon.

“Our job is important because without fuel, pilots would be pedestrians,” said Tech. Sgt. Aaron Simmons, 56th LRS NCO-in-charge of mobile distribution.

There are numerous government vehicles on base, and at some point they all need fixing. The 56th LRS Vehicle Maintenance Flight takes care of every aspect of the vehicle. From under the hood to the exterior, they do it all. But as you can imagine it can get pretty dirty. They work with grease, lubricants, oil, brake fluid, paint and grime in general.

Now we definitely don’t want to suggest the 56th Force Support Squadron dining facility is dirty, but it can be a pretty messy place to work at times. They handle food preparation from start to finish, and of course tons of cleaning after each meal. They have to prepare raw meats and deal with plenty of grease splatter from cooking.

Although they don’t look like they have a dirty job, don’t let their appearance fool you. The 56th Medical Support Squadron medical laboratory deals with anything and everything that comes out of the body. They deal with blood, urine, feces, semen, and saliva – anything associated with the body. They also harvest bacteria and diseases that can be found in a person’s body.

But, those with the dirtiest jobs are the ones who deal with all the stuff that goes down the toilet or sink. Everyday 500,000 to 600,000 gallons of sewage and waste pours into the Luke off-base waste water plant. After the sewage water goes through the plant and is properly filtered, it is reused to irrigate plants and grass on base and at Falcon Dunes Golf Course.

“We recycle the waste which helps the environment,” said Senior Airman Josh Billett, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron water and fuels system maintenance technician. “If it wasn’t for the plant, the base would have expenses in both sewage removal and irrigation.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Pg-1-Standalone---140411-F-HT977-026

Weather: Exercise component

First responders prepare to transport a simulated injured patient during an extreme weather exercise April 11 at Luke Air Force Base. The exercise was designed to train and evaluate Luke Airmen on readiness and preparation for ...
 
 
Courtesy photo

Plane crash, coma doesn’t deter pilot

Courtesy photo Retired Capt. David Berling, 56th Contracting Squadron contract specialist, stands in front of his 1977 Cessna RG March 23, 2012, at the Glendale Airport. Berling lost his legs in a 2007 plane crash, the subject ...
 
 

Comprehensive support system helps unit resiliency

In today’s Air Force environment of force restructure, budgetary constraints, continued mission requirements and resiliency, establishing a comprehensive support system in a unit is absolutely essential for success. Each organizational tier, whether at the element, flight or squadron level, must be resilient and have support mechanisms in place to not only meet, but exceed daily...
 

 

Preparing for next rank makes successful Airmen

As Airmen we have many responsibilities and duties we must carry out in accordance with our jobs. According to AFI 36-2618, The Enlisted Force Structure, our responsibilities are as follows: junior enlisted Airmen initially focus on adapting to military requirements, achieving occupational proficiency and learning how to become highly productive members of the Air Force....
 
 
Senior Airman
JASON COLBERT

Energy office helps keep lights on

Senior AirmanJASON COLBERT Master Sgt. Adam Kelley, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron base energy manager, explains the value of low wattage light bulbs to Robert Wimp at the Energy Conservation Month booth April 9 at Luke Air Force...
 
 

News Briefs April 18, 2014

Change of command Lt. Col. Jon Wheeler relinquishes command of the 310th Fighter Squadron to Lt. Col. Matthew Warner at 8:31 a.m. today in Hangar 913. Days of Remembrance The 2014 Days of Remembrance of the Holocaust Victims is May 2 at Club Five Six. A Holocaust exhibit of masks of holocaust survivors and paintings...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin