Local

November 16, 2012

Pulling the emergency brake

Senior Airman Kristopher Jones, 56th CES electric power production technician, checks the tape stack height during a six-month inspection. The stack height needs to be within a minimum and maximum range to be serviceable.

Ever wonder how an aircraft stops when the brakes fail? What do you think a pilot does when he or she has two blown tires and is traveling at 85 knots before driving off the end of the runway?

The 56th Civil Engineer Squadron Power Production has the answer. They maintain Luke’s eight aircraft arresting systems that stop an aircraft in emergencies. They also maintain critical facility generators.

“We provide a safe landing for aircraft that may experience malfunctions upon take off and landing,” said Tech. Sgt. Moses Osborne, 56th CES electrical power production. “Our overall goal is exceptional customer service and flawless maintenance. Lives depend on us.”

Senior Airman Michael Pauley, 56th CES electric power production technician, greases fairlead rollers during a six-month inspection.

Power production provides emergency support for all of Luke’s 138 F-16 aircraft and sorties flown totaling over 18,639 in fiscal 2012.

“The aircraft arresting system is an energy absorber,” said Staff Sgt. Brian Thorne, CES barrier maintenance shift leader. “The more energy or force that gets put into the system directly relates to the amount of energy the system will provide to stop the aircraft. Without the availability of these systems, in the case of an emergency, an aircraft will not be able to stop after it has landed.”

There are several scenarios in which aircraft experience emergencies.

Senior Airman Wesley Wagner, 56th CES electric power production technician, ties down the cable to barrier arresting kit 12 while setting it in service on the runway.

A fighter or training aircraft may experience an in-flight emergency or ground emergency due to mechanical failure or pilot physiological complications. Most common emergencies are brake failure, anti-skid and blown tires.

Power production Airmen work three shifts – morning, day and swing shifts. Swing shifters work until the last 56th Fighter Wing aircraft is on the ground. They also provide around-the-clock emergency standby power to more than 30 critical facilities across the base. They provide power capability in times of emergency to include adverse weather conditions. In fact, generators are ready to start within seconds of a commercial power outage.

“Emergency standby power is accomplished through vigorous recurring work program maintenance and testing of the generators and automatic electrical transfer switches,” Osborne said. “All of our RWP is scheduled in accordance with our governing Air Force instructions.”

In total, power production members spend three to four weeks at silver flag contingency training, as well as a trouble shooting class in order to be qualified on the arresting system and generators.

Senior Airman Michael Pauley, 56th CES electric power production technician, holds a tachometer during synchronization on a barrier arresting kit on the Luke Air Force Base flightline.

After three to four weeks of silver flag contingency training and a troubleshooting class held at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, all electrical power production members are qualified on both the arresting system and generators.

Thorne said it’s not hard to see how he and his teammates fit into the mission here.

“Not only are we saving lives and equipment with the arresting system, but also ensuring the continued efforts of others to save lives,” said Thorne.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

News Briefs February 27, 2015

MDG appointment line upgrade Patients calling the 56th Medical Group at 623-856-2273 Wednesday afternoon to schedule an appointment may reach a busy signal and may have to call back if all booking agents are on the line with other callers. The queue function allowing patients to wait on hold for the next available booking agent...
 
 

Always improving …

Staff Sgt. Staci Miller Staff Sgt. Andrea Caldwell, 56th Component Maintenance Squadron avionics production supervisor, performs an acceptance inspection on an enhanced upgraded programmable display generator Feb. 12. The EUPDG allows the pilot to program up to twelve displays.
 
 

Pay dates increase for civilians in 2015

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas — Civilian employees will have 27 pay dates in 2015 compared to the usual 26, so some employees might need to adjust their Thrift Savings Plan contribution elections to receive the maximum agency matching contributions for 2015. The Internal Revenue Code imposes a limit each year on the amount that...
 

 
DT_MAIN-PHOTO-150126-F-VN822-025

RMO Stakeholders keep eye on sky Pt. 2

Susan Gladstein Christian Black, 56th Range Management Office geographer, replaces the antenna on the Bender Springs weather station at the Barry M. Goldwater Range East. The new multidirectional antenna allows for a 360-degree...
 
 
18_150211-F-NQ441-87V

Full service wash …

Tech. Sgt. William Rotroff, 61st Aircraft Maintenance Unit F-35 dedicated crew chief, rinses an F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter after it gets a scrubbing Feb. 11 at the Luke Air Force Base wash rack. Crew chiefs are trai...
 
 
Senior Airman Devante Williams

Luke’s best shine

Senior Airman Devante Williams Misty Hyman, Olympic Gold Medalist, receives a standing ovation during her speech Feb. 13 at the 56th fighter Wing Annual Awards Banquet at the Wigwam. Hyman talked about the obstacles she faced d...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin