Local

December 7, 2012

Viper 30-year belle of ball at Luke

The first F-16 Fighting Falcon to arrive at Luke Air Force Base in 1982 sits on the flightline.

It was a Monday morning 30 years ago thursday when Col. Malcom Bolton, 58th Tactical Training Wing commander, stepped into a moment in history as he prepared to take off in the first permanently assigned F-16 Fighting Falcon at Luke Air Force Base.

Staff Sgt. Brian Seabury, 310th Aircraft Maintenance Unit crew chief, accompanied Bolton in the Block 1-B model, tail number 78-0081.

The 310th Fighter Squadron’s mission hasn’t changed since 1982: training the world’s finest fighter pilots and maintenance technicians, a heritage the 310th FS fighter pilots are still proud to be a part of, according to Lt. Col. John Forino, 310th FS director of operations.

“It makes all 310th FS pilots and maintainers proud as we are charged to carry on a long tradition of F-16 operations and maintenance to ensure we continue a legacy of perfection,” Forino said. “The 310th FS is also proud to be recognized as the only squadron in the Air Force to train F-16 pilots in the role of forward air controller-airborne, [pilots who control combat commands from the air] a mission uniquely suited to the capabilities of the F-16.”

The F-16 is the end result of multiple contributors including Lockheed Martin, NATO allies and fighter pilots from around the world. The air-to-air/air-to-ground, day and night, all-weather capabilities of the world’s premier multirole fighter make it a lethal threat to any enemy.

With its unparalleled maneuverability, speed and range, the F-16 served as a vital tool in combat operations from the Gulf War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

Thirty years after the first flight of a permanent-based F-16 at Luke, Forino said it’s still the best multirole fighter in the world.

“The F-16 is widely proliferated and the backbone of combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. What makes it the best are the skilled, professional and best trained fighter pilots in the world who operate them.”

Luke Air Force Base squadron F-16 Fighting Falcons fly in formation over base during a training exercise.

Today, the F-16 continues to provide unmatched support for the ongoing war in Afghanistan and other operations worldwide.

Even with the highly anticipated arrival of the F-35 at Luke, there’s no saying goodbye to the Fighting Falcon anytime soon.

“The F-16 is going to be here for a very long time,” said Col. Robert Webb, 56th Fighter Wing vice commander. “We are committed to the future, and that includes F-16s and F-35s right here at Luke.”

After 30 years at Luke, the F-16 not only holds a special place in the Air Force’s history, but with its unique capabilities and reliable qualities, it also holds a special place in the Air Force’s future.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Street Beat

The 56th Security Forces Squadron handled the following incidents Dec. 8 through Sunday: Tickets Security forces issued citations for seven moving violations and four nonmoving violations. Vehicle accidents Security forces responded to one minor vehicle accident. Nonemergency responses Dec. 11: Security forces responded to a child being left alone when the parent stated the child...
 
 
sports-060

Sports Shorts – December 19, 2014

Athletes showed muscle, generosity at F2F Justin Reed, 14, son of Tech. Sgt. Jill Reed, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron executions support NCO in charge, performs lunges during the Fit 2 Fight Throwdown Dec. 12 at the Luke Air For...
 
 
Staff Sgt. 
STACI MILLER

CMS aircraft fuel systems provides push for pilot

Staff Sgt.STACI MILLER Airman 1st Class Gary Esposito, 56th Component Maintenance Squadron aircraft fuel systems apprentice, prepares to inspect a 370-gallon external fuel tank on Luke Air Force Base. Esposito inspected the tan...
 

 
Senior Airman 
GRACE LEE

Latest F-35 has fastest induction to ALIS

Senior AirmanGRACE LEE The 14th F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter to arrive at Luke Air Force Base is shown Dec. 5 on the flightline. Airmen at the 61st Aircraft Maintenance Unit worked quickly to get the aircraft ready to...
 
 

Gratitude cultivates exceptional leadership

Several months ago I was inspired by the phrase “cultivate an attitude of gratitude.” The topic was presented in a religious context; however, I found these words significant and profound when considered as a tenent of exceptional leadership. Cultivate is an action verb. The word brings to mind images of an experienced gardener patiently tending...
 
 

Leadership vs. management

Have you ever had a boss or someone that made you want to come to work every day, someone you would do anything for without question? Then you were probably working beside a leader, not a manager. The biggest difference between managers and leaders is the way they motivate people who work for or follow...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin