Local

January 18, 2013

Family child care center opens doors

Senior Airman KATE VAUGHN
56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Oftentimes, Luke Air Force Base members contribute to two missions. One is the job but the other can be just as important — the one at home.

The 56th Force Support Squadron Family Child Care office knows the importance of home life, especially for those with children.

That’s why the FCC provides countless resources to help take care of Luke children.

FCC services offer a different type of setting for children than a typical day care center, according to Beth Oudean, FCC office director.

“Family Child Care offers options to military members who may want their children in a home setting with smaller groups of children,” she said.

Tech. Sgt. Corey Butler, 56th Force Support Squadron Ray V. Hensman Dining Facility shift leader, said he wouldn’t go anywhere else.

“We are very happy with our child care provider,” he said. “We wish we could take her with us when we move in February. Mrs. Oudean and her providers do an excellent job at placing children and ensuring they are well taken care of while the parents are at work.”

This method of child care is especially useful for parents working nontraditional shifts, or those with special-needs children.

But the FCC does more than just assist parents with finding good child care; it’s also the place to go for becoming a licensed child care provider.

“This is an outstanding opportunity for stay-at-home spouses,” Oudean said. “Providers can remain home with their own children, earn an income, set their own hours, and determine the age of children they want to care for and fee rates.”

After attending new provider training and becoming a licensed provider, caretakers can utilize tools and resources offered by the FCC.

“The FCC offers our licensed providers access to a large lending program,” Oudean said. “The program provides equipment such as tables, chairs, cubbies and toys to help set-up play environments with no out-of-pocket costs to providers.”

Whether it’s an alternative to standard child care, a provider that offers nontraditional hours or beginning the process of becoming a licensed provider, the FCC office can help.

For more information, call the FCC office at (623) 856-7472 or visit www.lukeevents.com and click on the Family Child Care link.

For assistance in obtaining child care, the FCC office is open 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. The FCC lending program is open for providers 4 to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.




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