Health & Safety

January 25, 2013

Depression has many signs

Tags:
Airman 1st Class GRACE LEE
56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

The symptoms of depression include not sleeping enough or too much, losing interest in activities one typically enjoys, experiencing significant feelings of guilt, lack of energy, loss of concentration, changes in appetite, unexplainable weight loss or gain, loss of sex drive and thoughts of suicide.

Most people have experienced sadness in their lives, but when one is sad more than happy for long periods of time it could be a sign of depression.

There are many symptoms of depression other than feeling sad or “blue,” according to Capt. Neal Kennington, 56th Medical Operations Squadron clinical psychologist.

It could be not sleeping enough or too much, losing interest in activities one typically enjoys, experiencing significant feelings of guilt, lack of energy, loss of concentration, changes in appetite, unexplainable weight loss or gain, loss of sex drive and thoughts of suicide.

“Experiencing some of the symptoms is normal and common for most people at some point in their lives,” Kennington said. “But one should be concerned when these symptoms are going on more days than not over an extended period of time, which can vary.”

Although many may feel they are alone in their fight with depression, the staff at the Luke Air Force Base Mental Health Clinic is here to help.

“We offer our services to all active-duty service members as well as dependents and retirees,” said Tech. Sgt. Anna McCumbers, 56th MDOS behavioral health flight chief. “We do not see children, but we do assist in setting them up with TRICARE-approved providers in the local area.”

Additionally, the MHC tailors their treatment plans to individuals and their needs.

“We have both individual and group therapy sessions,” McCumbers said. “The length that one goes to treatment varies, but a person can opt out of treatment at anytime as long as he came in on a voluntary basis.”

The MHC also keeps the client’s sessions confidential — to a degree.

“The MHC has limited confidentiality,” Kennington said. “This means information shared with a provider is confidential with several important exceptions.
Providers cannot keep confidentiality on reports of plans to harm oneself or someone else, reports of abuse against children and elderly adults, breaches of the Uniform Code of Military Justice, and, for active-duty personnel, information that would impact one’s ability to perform normal duties.”

Though there are exceptions, personnel can be confident that the MHC will keep all other matters private.

“The majority of cases in the MHC do not involve any reports outside of confidentiality and most active-duty members treated in the MHC come and go without anyone in their leadership ever knowing that they’ve received treatment,” Kennington said.

McCumbers encourages those who are suffering from depression to seek help.

“Depression is common,” McCumbers said. “Understand that you are not alone and there are services available to assist you. If you know someone who is suffering from symptoms of depression encourage them to talk to someone.”

The MHC is open 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and walk-in hours are 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. They are located on the second floor of Bldg. 1130. For more information, call the MHC at (623) 856-7579.

Other on-base agencies that can help with depression are the military and family life consultant in the Airman and Family Readiness Center, Bldg. 1113 and can be reached at (623) 238-0565; or the chaplains in the chapel, Bldg. 25. They can be reached at (623) 856-6211.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Comprehensive-Airman-Fitness

CAF: Physical domain helps get Tbolts through holidays

The holidays are usually associated with parties, family gatherings, buying gifts, over indulgences in our favorite foods and stress. One way to enjoy the holidays and improve personal resilience is by strengthening the physica...
 
 
Courtesy photo

944th FW dietitian competes, walks talk

Courtesy photo Tech. Sgt. Grace Haecker, 944th Aeromedical Staging Squadron NCO in charge diet therapy/unit fitness program manager, poses in an annual fitness competition Sept. 13 at Luke Air Force Base. Haecker took first pla...
 
 

Street Beat

The 56th Security Forces Squadron handled the following incidents Nov. 10 through 16: Tickets Security forces responded to 10 moving violations and three nonmoving violations. Vehicle accidents: Security forces responded to two minor accidents. Emergency responses Nov. 11: Security forces was informed a 56th SFS military working dog collapsed while walking in a Veterans Day...
 

 

Street Beat

The 56th Security Forces Squadron handled the following incidents Oct. 27 through Nov. 3: Tickets Security forces issued citations for seven moving violations and five nonmoving violations. Traffic-related responses Security forces responded to two minor accidents and one major accident. Nonemergency responses Oct. 30: Security forces was informed of a possible assault in base housing....
 
 
Staff Sgt. Timothy Boyer

CES inspects base infrastructure

Staff Sgt. Timothy Boyer Staff Sgt. Steven Stein, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron electrical subject matter expert, points out a damaged water heater Oct. 24 to Senior Airman Sandham Challis, 56th CES structural subject matter exp...
 
 
coutesty-photo-2

Airman smoke free for two years

There’s a killer on the loose — tobacco. It entices many each day. More than 3,200 people smoke their first cigarette under the age of 18 each day, and about 2,100 youth and young adults become daily smokers, according to B...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin