Air Force

February 8, 2013

On-the-go app makes it easier to ‘be ready’

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. — Whether it’s an active shooter or natural disaster, when emergencies occur, it’s important to be prepared.

Now, thanks to Air Force Emergency Management, there’s an app for that.

The Air Force Civil Engineer Center’s Emergency Management Division here has developed an Air Force “Be Ready” mobile app, or application, for use on Android devices. The app was designed as an on-the-go source for emergency hazard information and preparation guides and is the latest resource available through AFEM’s Be Ready Awareness Campaign.

“The Be Ready app provides information about what to do before, during and after specific threats,” said Rob Genova, AFCEC emergency management education and training specialist. “It’s a complement to our printed Air Force Emergency Preparedness Guide.”

Having worked through hurricanes, tornadoes and other emergencies, Jay Granberg, a news photographer at WMBB-TV in Panama City, Fla., said he’s impressed with the app.

“It’s simple, easy to use, not cluttered like other apps I’ve seen. There’s a lot of information, and it moves smoothly from section to section. It will be a great resource, not only for my family, but for those times when I am covering disasters that affect the community,” Granberg said.

The app offers emergency education and awareness information, and gives users tools to better prepare them for disasters.

“It has a family evacuation plan that you can tailor to your needs,” said Genova. “It’s pre-loaded with emergency numbers and sites like the Federal Emergency Management Agency and Red Cross. You can also add your own emergency contacts and local agencies.

“We encourage everyone to have an emergency supply kit,” Genova said, “and the app provides a checklist for items you may need which you can modify to match your particular region or threat.”

Feedback for the app, which was downloaded more than 250 times within the first four days of release, has been very positive, Genova said.

Air Force officials know there’s a need for products on other mobile platforms and they’re working on delivering that.

 




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