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March 15, 2013

Squadron symbols embrace significance

Air Force shields and symbols are created to identify and set apart each organization and convey a specific meaning created to describe the purpose, warrior ethos and passion to complete the mission of that organization. These are just a few from the 56th Fighter Wing.
56-FW

Constituted as 56th Pursuit Group

Activated Jan. 15, 1941

The orange background of the shield represents the Army Air Corps and the 56th Fighter Group’s World War II service, whose honors and history the wing inherits. The heraldic chevron represents support and signifies the wing’s support of our nation’s quest for peace. The blue of the chevron represents the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. The lightning bolts are symbolic of speed, aggressiveness, and the capability to strike immediately in any direction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21FS
Constituted as 21st Fighter Squadron Oct. 5, 1944

Activated Oct. 15, 1944

The emblem is deeply rooted in the traditions and history of the Taiwanese people. The cards totaling 21 signify perfection and the pursuit of victory in any endeavor. Specifically, the king of spades represents the Taiwanese people, the ace of hearts represents the heart of a nation, and the arrow signifies absolute integrity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

308FS

Constituted as 308th Pursuit Squadron, interceptor Jan. 21, 1942

Activated Jan. 30, 1942

Yellow is an Air Force color and refers to the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The checkered pattern suggests the field of battle. The arrowhead denotes the aircraft of the squadron in association with the field of battle. The armored arm grasping a sword symbolizes the unit’s ability to defend the peace. The sword piercing the cloud stands for the sky, the unit’s theater of operation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

309FS
Constituted as the 309th Pursuit Squadron, interceptor, Jan. 21, 1942

Activated Jan. 30, 1942

Significance: Blue and yellow are the Air Force colors. Blue alludes to the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow refers to the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The disc is blended dark to light blue indicating the unit’s day and night defense capabilities. The single star and constellation depict the squadron’s pioneering efforts in the establishment of celestial navigation as a viable and integral method of navigation for fighter units. Donald Duck in flight gear grasping a lightning bolt and board with nail symbolizes the lineage of the unit as a fighter squadron and its defense and striking capabilities through in-flight refueling. It also implies the squadron’s participation in two historic long-range ocean crossings.

 

 

 

 

 

310FS
Constituted as 310th Pursuit Squadron, interceptor, Jan. 21, 1942

Activated Feb. 9, 1942

Significance: Blue and yellow are the Air Force colors. Blue alludes to the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow refers to the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The skull represents death and the possibility that the unit may be called to defend the peace at any time. The dice symbolize that the squadron will win, with a natural seven, in its gamble with death. The lightning bolts denote the weapons systems employed by the squadron.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

425FS
Constituted as the 425th Night Fighter Squadron, Nov. 23, 1943

Activated Dec. 1, 1943

On a red globe is a fighter pilot’s gunsight. A black widow spider is superimposed over the gunsight. On either side of the spider is a white lightning bolt. The red globe is consistent with Singaporean national colors, acknowledging their role in the reactivation of this squadron. The unit mission is to support Peace Carvin II (foreign military sales), selling F-16s and training to the Republic of Singapore. The gun sight reflects the tools of the fighter pilot’s trade. It also symbolizes the web of the black widow spider. The black widow spider maintains historical continuity with the squadron’s original mission as a P-61 Black Widow Night Fighter Squadron in World War II. The lightning bolts on either side of the spider symbolize the striking power of modern tactical fighters.

“Cave Tonitrum,” Beware the Thunderbolt!

 

 

 

 

 

62-FS
Constituted as 62d Pursuit Squadron Nov. 20, 1940

Activated Jan. 15, 1941

Blue and yellow are the Air Force colors. Blue alludes to the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow refers to the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The bulldog represents the tenacity and aggressiveness of a fighter squadron, qualities further emphasized by the stance of the subject. The gloved fists symbolize a clean fighter, while the lightning suggests the squadron’s striking power. His expression shows that he is obviously a “tough customer,” hard to handle in a fight, not easily discouraged and unafraid.




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