Health & Safety

March 29, 2013

April: Child Abuse Prevention Month

Saving children from abuse phone call away

Americans are more aware than ever of the tragedy of child abuse. The national and local media carry daily reports of children who have been beaten, imprisoned, starved, burned or sexually and emotionally abused. Shopping carts, milk cartons, billboards, newspapers all carry the message that children should tell if they’re being hurt and that to prevent abuse, just call a hotline and help will arrive.

However, we are slowly awakening to the fact that, even if suspected abuse is reported, this does not always result in safeguarding the child from further abuse. In fact, some of the worst cases are those where authorities were notified of abuse and had determined that the child was at risk, but left the child in the care of the abuser.

If you suspect abuse, don’t wait until you can “prove” child abuse. Make a report whenever concern over the safety of a child turns into a suspicion that the child is being abused or neglected. Call immediately if it is suspected there is abuse happening.

When seeking to report child abuse, it is important to remember these points:

Child abuse must be reported within the state it occurs

Not every state has a statewide reporting hotline (the Arizona hotline is (800) SOS-CHILD or go to http://www.de.state.az.us/dcyf/cps/)

Not every state hotline will be accessible 24/7 or accessible outside of that state

It may take a while to get through to the statewide number so callers should be patient; it may take more than one call so callers should not give up (in an emergency call 911)

Callers should have as much information as possible about the abuse and the child being reported. Organize and write down information and have it ready before the call is made. If all the information is not available, make the call anyway. The intake worker will determine if there is enough to make the report. Ask what additional information is needed.

Suggested information to provide:

• Child’s name, address, phone number, age and gender

• Location of the child at the time of the report

• Parents’ names, address and phone number

• Name of the abuser

• Type of abuse (callers should be as specific as possible about what has been observed), or what is suspected

• Presence of siblings or other children living in the home and their names, gender and ages

• School child attends

• Any language barrier

Keep a record of what is reported and what is said during the reporting, the date the call is made, and the intake person’s name and identification number. The called should keep the original notes as a personal record of the event.

To determine if an action being observed is abuse, call the hotline for guidance. If the caller is not comfortable with the answers, he should ask to speak with a supervisor.

Callers can report anonymously if the person is not someone who is required by law to report child abuse.

For more information or assistance, call family advocacy at (623) 856-3417.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Fourth of July: Celebrate safely

On July 4th, America will celebrate its 239th birthday with festivities across the country. They may include fireworks, swimming, boating, camping, picnics, barbeques, consumption of alcohol and travel. “From 2009 to 2013 during the summer months of June through September, the Air Force had three fatalities,” said Ben Bruce, 56th Fighter Wing Ground Safety manager....
 
 

Street Beat

The 56th Security Forces Squadron handled the following incidents June 15 through 21: Tickets Security forces issued citations for six moving violations and two nonmoving violations. Traffic-related incidents June 17: Security forces responded to a report of a minor two-vehicle accident at the intersection of 143rd Avenue and Spad Street. An investigation revealed the driver of...
 
 
Staff Sgt. Staci Miller

Finding perfect shape takes out-of-box look

Staff Sgt. Staci Miller Senior Airman Grace Lee, 56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs, changed her definition of the perfect body for herself by getting a new perspective. Weight gain has been a constant struggle for me since I was...
 

 
6_121006-F-EC705-040

June: Men’s Health Month

AF promotes awareness of diseases in men Airman 1st Class Jordan Cook, 56th Medical Operations Squadron medical lab technician, takes blood from Karl Loving, retired Army major, during a men’s health expo at Luke Air Force Ba...
 
 
7_courtesy-photo

Don’t throw a fit — get fit

Courtesy photo It’s a controversial topic that has been brought up by many Airmen — changing the abdominal circumference standards on the Air Force fitness assessment test. After months of debate, it was decided by Air Forc...
 
 

Street Beat

The 56th Security Forces Squadron handled the following incidents June 8 through 14: Tickets Security forces issued citations for two moving violations and one nonmoving violation. Emergency responses June 8: Security forces and firefighters responded to a report of a child, age 3, locked inside a vehicle near Bldg. 942. The child was accidentally locked...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>