Commentary

July 26, 2013

Mentoring happens on daily basis

Senior Master Sgt. DONNA FOWLER
56th Logistics Readiness Squadron

What do teaching, coaching and mentoring all have in common? They all require communication and interaction. Teaching and coaching typically involve a controlled environment with determined settings, timeframes and performance centered on improvement in a specific skill area. Mentoring, on the other hand, is open, continues to evolve over time and allows nurturing of the “whole person.” Mentoring should not be a scheduled event, briefing or setting. It naturally happens every day. How it is delivered and accepted is what makes all the difference.

There is no doubt, mentoring has become a significant part of our Air Force culture. It is important that we cultivate future leaders and develop a path for young Airmen to follow. All Airmen (regardless of rank), need leadership, guidance and support throughout their career – personal and professional. Airmen are encouraged to become “well-rounded,” so where and how do we teach this lesson? Basic military and technical training schools continue to teach Airman fundamentals and basic skills. So what happens after training?

Everyday Airmen are placed in squadrons all over the world with no idea what they’re supposed to do next. Their training prepares them to follow a structured set of rules, but never taught them how to properly seek out a mentor. In general, Airmen are apprehensive when it comes to confiding or seeking guidance in other members of higher rank. As leaders, at any grade or rank, it is our responsibility to ensure we are approachable and available. We are here to help, lead, mold and mentor young Airmen on a constant basis, to help them become successful and reach true potential, remembering that one day not so long ago, we too were those young Airmen.

Mentoring has many positive effects. It allows individuals to gain insight into the organization and can increase commitment to its goals. It can also improve communication and change culture for the better.

Mentoring promotes improved levels of professional success. Lastly, mentoring gives members the opportunity to meet people and promotes social networking.

Mentoring helps Airmen develop insight through guidance and support. A mentor asks the right questions to promote greater self-awareness and informed decision making. Airmen also receive feedback on performance, potential, career progression and future plans. The role of mentors is not to solve problems, but to question how the best solutions might be found.

Mentoring is a great opportunity to show interest in others and get involved. Mentors also benefit from this relationship by getting to know the mentee, learning what is relevant to him, gaining experience and ultimately, could be changed by the relationship.

I truly believe, the earlier we take an active interest in our young Airmen, the stronger we make our Air Force.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Senior Airman
JAMES HENSLEY

F-35 pilot training underway

Senior AirmanJAMES HENSLEY Travis Byrom, Lockheed Martin instructor pilot, briefs students in the first F-35 Lightning II training course before the start of class May 5 at Luke Air Force Base. The students are Lt. Col. Sean Ho...
 
 

Everything I need to know about leadership, I learned …

I am sure you’ve heard of, or even read, Robert Fulgham’s best-selling book, “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten.” Fulgham’s text resonates with many for the simplicity with which he describes “how to be a person.” Leadership in the 21st century Air Force is a much discussed topic, and one can...
 
 

Which one are you?

Have you ever worked for someone you felt was impossible to deal with? How about someone who you simply tolerated? Or have you worked for someone you actually really wanted to work for? What was your work environment like, and what was the attitude of the people among the different types of bosses? Let’s be...
 

 
Senior Airman 
DEVANTE WILLIAMS

Wild Weasels reunite

Senior AirmanDEVANTE WILLIAMS The Wild Weasels gather for a group photo during their reunion May 1 at Luke Air Force Base. The Wild Weasels were formed during the early days of the Vietnam War. Their mission was to seek out and...
 
 

News Briefs May 15, 2015

Leadership Gold Members of the Profession of Arms Center of Excellence are visiitng Luke to present Dr. John Maxwell’s Leadership Gold, which grows leaders and fosters teamwork, at 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 2 in the Navy Operational Support Center, Bldg. 300, Room 412. Open to civilians and all ranks of enlisted and officers....
 
 

AF announces senior selects

The following master sergeants have been selected for promotion to senior master sergeant: 61st Fighter Squadron Heather Hefner 56th Maintenance Group Christian Brandon 56th Equipment Maintenance Squadron Paul Branstetter and Brian Leonard 56th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Andres Vasquez 308th Aircraft Maintenance Unit William Jennings 310th AMU John Taylor 56th Civil Engineer Squadron Tommy C...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin