Sports

July 26, 2013

Single Airmen offered free bowling lessons

Clyde Higa, United States Bowling Congress bronze level coach, instructs Heather Tugung, spouse of Ulbert Tugung, 56th Logistics Readiness Squadron, on bowling technique July 20 during the hook-up-to-bowling event at Thunderbolt Lanes. Higa coached participants on bowling fundamentals such as how to select the correct bowling ball, the approach, where to aim and how to properly throw the ball down the lane.

 
Have you ever wanted to learn how to bowl? What if you could receive free lessons? Although it’s open to everyone, the Single Airman Program is offering the lessons at no cost to single Airmen. The hook-up-to-bowling event includes instruction from a professional bowling coach.

The hook-up-to-bowling lessons will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturdays through Aug. 3. Single Airmen participating in the program will receive a free bowling ball and bag.

“I will teach the fundamentals of bowling such as how to select the correct bowling ball, the approach, where to aim and how to properly throw the ball down the lane,” said Clyde Higa, U.S. Bowling Congress bronze level coach. “During the sessions, I will try to set them up with a good foundation for becoming a successful bowler.”

The lessons are for beginners and anyone who’s interested in becoming a better bowler. Yadira Chaidez, 56th Medical Operations Squadron, was a beginner who didn’t have much knowledge of bowling before starting the lessons.

“I honestly didn’t know what I was doing before,” she said. “I heard about the bowling lessons and wanted to learn more.”

In just two lessons Chaidez has improved with Higa’s instruction.

Daniel Blazier, 56th Operations Support Squadron, knocks down nine pins on his first throw during the eighth frame July 20 at the bowling event. Blazier picked up the spare. Airmen participating in the program receive a free bowling ball and bag.

“I’ve learned that there is much more to bowling than just throwing the ball down the lane, and I had no idea that there is a position or stance that you’re supposed to be in after you bowl,” she said. “Higa looked at the way I bowled, suggested changes and helped me to improve. I was barely bowling a 100 before taking this course, and after the first lesson I scored in the mid 140s.”

Higa’s desire is that the Airmen will gain more than just the bowling fundamentals.

“I hope they get to where they enjoy the game and continue to improve their skills,” he said.

 




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