Commentary

July 26, 2013

To serve requires automatic sacrifice

Tech. Sgt. JOYE LAMME
56th Medical Support Squadron

For those who have been in the service for a while, sacrifice is a word that is well known and experienced by all. It can be used to describe numerous occasions. It brings sorrow to some and pride to others. It is viewed in multiple ways. It’s not a bad word and can be seen throughout the span of a person’s military career.

In the beginning of a military career, a lot is sacrificed. People give up their civilian lives in order to serve a higher purpose. Some sacrifice more than others. Families, friends and lifestyles are left behind. This isn’t easy for some. This life change takes getting used to. Not everyone is prepared for the amount of free time, independence and sleep they sacrifice. Many must adapt to a new way of life with new standards. Many will see a change in who they are, or it may go unnoticed.

For those able to adapt, sacrifice becomes a nonissue. Others will find it too much and separate. It may be deployment was too much or being too far away from family. Some hate always being on the move, leaving those they meet along the way. It could be experience has shown them this isn’t the life they want. Others thrive on the life feeling that sacrifice has given them a sense of purpose. They will enjoy traveling, meeting new people, expanding their extended family.

Sacrifice is good or bad depending on how you view it. Sacrifice should be made freely. Parents sacrifice hours of sleep to care for a child. They sacrifice many things they don’t even realize to do what’s right for the family.

In the military, it’s the same way. If sacrifice becomes a way of life rather than a burden, then in a way, you have accepted the military as your family. Your sacrifices have become a privilege rather than a curse.




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