Air Force

October 4, 2013

Drug demand reduction program tests Airmen

Tags:
Senior Airman GRACE LEE
56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Staff Sgt. Michael Gorske, 56th Equipment Maintenance Squadron drug demand reduction assistant, places a tamper-resistant tape on a collection bottle Sept. 25 at the drug demand reduction building on Luke Air Force Base. The goal of the DDR program is to stop the use and abuse of controlled and illegal substances through education, prevention and deterrence, and provide scientifically accurate results that are forensically defensible.

The use of illegal drugs can not only be devastating to the health of the user but also to the Air Force mission. That’s why there is a program called drug demand reduction. Its goal is to stop the use and abuse of controlled and illegal substances through a comprehensive program of education, prevention and deterrence, and to provide scientifically accurate results that will stand up in court.

“The DDR program is imperative to the Air Force mission because to have a force that is mission ready means having a drug-free force,” said Jennifer Deans, 56th Medical Operations Squadron DDR program manager. “For example, a jet fixed improperly due to someone being under the influence of a drug while fixing it, can have dire consequences for the pilot who will be flying the jet.”

To prevent drug abuse, Airmen are tested randomly and daily.

“Every active-duty Airman on Luke Air Force Base is subject to random drug testing,” Deans said. “We use computer software that is designed to generate a random list of names daily. Once the software gives us the list of names, we notify the units and the member. Once notified, the member has two hours from the time of notification to come in for the drug test.”

The program also conducts random gate sweeps, Deans said. The gate sweeps are used to deter personnel from using drugs over the weekend. If a member fails to show within a given timeframe, their first sergeant will be called to find them and send them to drug testing followed by disciplinary actions.

Drug abuse in the Air Force is defined as the wrongful, illegal, or illicit use of a controlled substance, prescription medication, over-the-counter medication, or intoxicating substance other than alcohol. It can also be the possession, distribution or introduction onto a military installation of any controlled substance.

“Wrongful use of prescription medication means using drugs that weren’t prescribed to you or using them contrary to the directions of the manufacturer,” Deans said. “Other drugs that are illegal in the Air Force are marijuana, hemp seed products, cocaine, ecstasy, methamphetamines, heroine, bath salts and spice, to name a few.”

If an Airman tests positive, the consequences can be devastating to the member’s career.

“If an active-duty member tests positive for illegal drugs he can be subject to an Article 15, resulting in forfeiture of pay and reduction in rank,” said Capt. Michael Saylor, 56th Fighter Wing chief of military justice. “Depending on the case, the offender could be subject to a court martial that can include confinement, punitive discharge, reduction in rank and forfeiture of pay.”

Members should think twice before saying yes to drugs, according to Deans.

“The use and abuse of drugs affects more than just you,” Deans said. “It can affect your family and the community as a whole. Take pride in being drug free.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Senior Airman Grace Lee

TAP changes to better prepare Airmen for civilian life

Senior Airman Grace Lee Dawn Reynolds, American Veterans representative, speaks to a Transition Assistance Program class. The Luke Air Force Base Airman and Family Readiness Center Transition Assistance Program has recently und...
 
 

JAG Corps announces 2015 law school programs

Legal Officers interested in continuing to serve the Air Force as judge advocates are invited to apply to the Funded Legal Education Program and Excess Leave Program. Officers selected for FLEP have the opportunity to attend law school at Air Force expense while also continuing to receive full pay, allowances and tuition. Officers chosen for...
 
 
DT_JTC0216

Supreme allied commander comes home

Gen. Philip Breedlove, left, NATO supreme allied commander, Europe, visited Luke Air Force Base Sept. 12. Brig. Gen. Scott Pleus, right, 56th Fighter Wing commander, briefed the general on Luke’s evolving mission to train F-3...
 

 
Senior Airman Grace Lee

Command post chief averts potential disaster

Senior Airman Grace Lee Capt. George Normandin, 56th Fighter Wing Command Post chief, received the Aviation Safety Well Done Award Sept. 2, presented by Brig. Gen. Scott Pleus, 56th FW commander. Normandin took control of an F-...
 
 
Senior Airman
MARCY COPELAND

EOD Airman changed for good by life experiences

Senior AirmanMARCY COPELAND Tech. Sgt. David Gerig’s, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal team chief, first assignment after technical school was Kadena Air Base, Japan. The challenges in life are often w...
 
 
Courtesy photo

Helping people goal of CPTS Airman

Courtesy photo Airman 1st Class Scott Giles, left, 56th Comptroller Squadron customer service technician, holds “trumpet in flight” at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. Giles now helps new Airmen in-process to Luke Air Force ...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin