Air Force

October 4, 2013

Drug demand reduction program tests Airmen

Tags:
Senior Airman GRACE LEE
56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Staff Sgt. Michael Gorske, 56th Equipment Maintenance Squadron drug demand reduction assistant, places a tamper-resistant tape on a collection bottle Sept. 25 at the drug demand reduction building on Luke Air Force Base. The goal of the DDR program is to stop the use and abuse of controlled and illegal substances through education, prevention and deterrence, and provide scientifically accurate results that are forensically defensible.

The use of illegal drugs can not only be devastating to the health of the user but also to the Air Force mission. That’s why there is a program called drug demand reduction. Its goal is to stop the use and abuse of controlled and illegal substances through a comprehensive program of education, prevention and deterrence, and to provide scientifically accurate results that will stand up in court.

“The DDR program is imperative to the Air Force mission because to have a force that is mission ready means having a drug-free force,” said Jennifer Deans, 56th Medical Operations Squadron DDR program manager. “For example, a jet fixed improperly due to someone being under the influence of a drug while fixing it, can have dire consequences for the pilot who will be flying the jet.”

To prevent drug abuse, Airmen are tested randomly and daily.

“Every active-duty Airman on Luke Air Force Base is subject to random drug testing,” Deans said. “We use computer software that is designed to generate a random list of names daily. Once the software gives us the list of names, we notify the units and the member. Once notified, the member has two hours from the time of notification to come in for the drug test.”

The program also conducts random gate sweeps, Deans said. The gate sweeps are used to deter personnel from using drugs over the weekend. If a member fails to show within a given timeframe, their first sergeant will be called to find them and send them to drug testing followed by disciplinary actions.

Drug abuse in the Air Force is defined as the wrongful, illegal, or illicit use of a controlled substance, prescription medication, over-the-counter medication, or intoxicating substance other than alcohol. It can also be the possession, distribution or introduction onto a military installation of any controlled substance.

“Wrongful use of prescription medication means using drugs that weren’t prescribed to you or using them contrary to the directions of the manufacturer,” Deans said. “Other drugs that are illegal in the Air Force are marijuana, hemp seed products, cocaine, ecstasy, methamphetamines, heroine, bath salts and spice, to name a few.”

If an Airman tests positive, the consequences can be devastating to the member’s career.

“If an active-duty member tests positive for illegal drugs he can be subject to an Article 15, resulting in forfeiture of pay and reduction in rank,” said Capt. Michael Saylor, 56th Fighter Wing chief of military justice. “Depending on the case, the offender could be subject to a court martial that can include confinement, punitive discharge, reduction in rank and forfeiture of pay.”

Members should think twice before saying yes to drugs, according to Deans.

“The use and abuse of drugs affects more than just you,” Deans said. “It can affect your family and the community as a whole. Take pride in being drug free.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Staff Sgt. 
STACI MILLER

CMS aircraft fuel systems provides push for pilot

Staff Sgt.STACI MILLER Airman 1st Class Gary Esposito, 56th Component Maintenance Squadron aircraft fuel systems apprentice, prepares to inspect a 370-gallon external fuel tank on Luke Air Force Base. Esposito inspected the tan...
 
 
Senior Airman 
GRACE LEE

Latest F-35 has fastest induction to ALIS

Senior AirmanGRACE LEE The 14th F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter to arrive at Luke Air Force Base is shown Dec. 5 on the flightline. Airmen at the 61st Aircraft Maintenance Unit worked quickly to get the aircraft ready to...
 
 

Gratitude cultivates exceptional leadership

Several months ago I was inspired by the phrase “cultivate an attitude of gratitude.” The topic was presented in a religious context; however, I found these words significant and profound when considered as a tenent of exceptional leadership. Cultivate is an action verb. The word brings to mind images of an experienced gardener patiently tending...
 

 

Leadership vs. management

Have you ever had a boss or someone that made you want to come to work every day, someone you would do anything for without question? Then you were probably working beside a leader, not a manager. The biggest difference between managers and leaders is the way they motivate people who work for or follow...
 
 

Decking the halls …

Staff Sgt. Timothy Boyer Andrea Mathis, 56th Force Support Squadron Fighter Country Inn accounting clerk, decorates a Christmas tree Dec. 4 in the lobby at the Fighter Country Inn at Luke Air Force Base. Base lodging is available to active-duty service members, retirees and dependents on a space-available basis. For more information, call 623-856-3941.
 
 

Safety begins with asking ‘What could go wrong?’

I’m sure most of us have been told to “be safe” at some point either by a commander, supervisor or even a co-worker. This holiday season will probably not be any different. Someone will use this simple phrase in the next few weeks, and it will feel like a cliché to you, but what does...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin