Local

November 8, 2013

Airman walks balanced life

There is a different way of life to discover if you are willing to travel to Northern Arizona.

“It is called ‘Sa’ah Naghai Bik’eh Hozhoon (Dine),’ in English it means ‘as to walk in a balanced life, with longevity and happiness,’” said Staff Sgt. Paulette Yazzie, 56th Civil Engineer Squadron waters and fuels systems craftsman and Navajo Indian from the Dine Tribe of Chinle on the Navajo Reservation. “The Dine way of life places human life in harmony with the natural world and the universe.”

This way of life is that of my people, who live on the largest reservation in the United States, she said. Her people are rich in service to the country.

“Members of our tribe were Navajo code talkers, used by the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II,” Yazzie said, with a glimmer of pride in her eyes. “They had unbreakable code that helped win battles and ultimately end the war. My people have served in the military since the 1800s when the U.S. Army came out West.”

She was raised on the reservation, in isolation from those who were not from her tribe. She grew up riding horses and competing in rodeos, and attended kindergarten through eighth grade with only other Navajo children. It wasn’t until high school Yazzie encountered other cultures.

“My high school years were spent in Winslow living in a dorm and seeing my family on weekends,” she said. “This is where I finally went to school with other races, and where I saw how others really felt about Navajos. I didn’t know about discrimination until this time.”

Yazzie joined the Air Force in June of 2002, after graduating high school.

“I joined because I wanted to gain experience and have firsthand knowledge of life outside my own culture,” she said. “One of the leaders from long ago, Chief Manuelito, told us if we wanted to get ahead in life we should go to school and bring that knowledge back to the people. His words inspired me to want to do the best for my family and my people. The Air Force core values just added fuel to my fire of being the best person I can be.”

As Yazzie integrated into the Air Force, she noticed the tides of acceptance shifting.

“I saw that our country was slowly growing accepting of natives,” she said. “It was a merging of two worlds for me, western and Dine.”

She finds it difficult, at times, to explain her values to others, and she said there is a language barrier to battle through.

“I pray to the east as the sun is rising to give me strength,” she said of her traditions, which she observers today. “Our reservation is within the four mountains that protect our people. It was from when the four different worlds tried to reach this world. We have tons of stories.”

While her traditions are important to her and her tribe, Yazzie encourages Airmen to learn about other cultures as well.

“All natives are not the same,” she said. “We have similar stories, all rich in their own right. Take a day with a Native American to learn more about our country. Arizona has more to it than desert. Up north, there is a whole different world.”

From a childhood during which there was only one way of life, to fighting for a diverse country, Yazzie has much to be proud of.

“It’s like I’m fighting for two nations, Navajo Nation and America,” she said. “I hold both dear to my heart and am proud to make the sacrifice to protect the lands.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Luke welcomes Nurse Advice Line

Remember that moment? The moment you thought you had something medically wrong with you but didn’t know exactly what it was? After a few Web searches, you find yourself on WebMD and are questioning whether you have the least worrying of possible diagnoses or the worst — cancer or even death. To help patients save...
 
 
141020-SMSgt-Shelly-Bailey-8x10-DW

Path to inspirational leadership evolving skillset

Senior Master Sgt. Shelly Bailey At some point in our Air Force career we will assume a leadership role. Leadership is an ever-evolving skillset that you will continue to develop throughout the course of your career. The highes...
 
 

Bridges: build, don’t burn

Have you heard the phrase “don’t burn your bridges?” This idiom is used to describe the importance of not ending a relationship on a bad note. In this case, the relationship is your military career. For example, when you build professional relationships you are networking or laying the foundation for the building of a bridge....
 

 
141008-F-HT977-005

Unaccompanied housing to be upgraded

Funds have arrived from Air Education and Training Command for unaccompanied housing to use to take care of Airmen in the dorms, from reconstruction of dorms to fixing a door knob. “With these funds we are able to maintain do...
 
 

News Briefs October 24, 2014

Notice to claimants In accordance with Air Force Instruction 34-511, paragraph 3.1.5, notice is hereby given that Airman 1st Class Wheeler Nichols is deceased. The undersigned has been appointed summary court officer for the purpose of estate settlement in accordance with AFI 34-511. All persons having claims for or against the estate should call Lt....
 
 
Senior Airman Grace Lee

New honorary commanders inducted

Senior Airman Grace Lee Honorary commanders chat with Luke Air Force Base leaders Oct. 17 during social hour in Hangar 431 at Luke Air Force Base prior to their official induction ceremony. The honorary commander program partne...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin