Health & Safety

January 31, 2014

Safety: Priority 1 to kick off year right

Tags:
Airman 1st Class PEDRO MOTA
56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Chief Petty Officer Nicholas Hunt, Naval Operations Support Center avionics technician chief, demonstrates proper form to reduce the risk of injury Jan. 27 in the warrior fitness center. Since 2004, the Air Force has lost approximately 400 personnel due to recreational activities, according to Ben Bruce, 56th Fighter Wing ground safety manager.

It’s human nature to test and push limits, but at times we overlook the risks associated with a particular situation. While attempting physical challenges, people are injured because they aren’t fully aware of the possibility that something unpleasant could happen.

It’s the duty of Ben Bruce, 56th Fighter Wing ground safety manager, to help the wing commander and all subordinate commanders manage their health and safety programs, ensuring mishap prevention and safety compliance. The “Safety Dude,” as many know him, makes sure safety is first 24/7.

“When we understand there is a chance of danger to everything we do, we become aware of the risks,” Bruce said. “The idea is to not be afraid of that activity, but to think about those major risks.”

Since 2004, the Air Force has lost about 150 service members due to combat and approximately 400 due to recreational activities including car accidents, motorcycle accidents and sports mishaps, Bruce said. The real danger for Air Force personnel isn’t combat but the daily grind.

When on duty, personnel have guidelines they must abide by, as well as having safety instructors and supervisors. But when off duty the responsibility of ensuring safety falls on each individual, and it can become challenging to perceive the risk of the activity.

Potentially dangerous situations can be averted by doing a risk awareness exercise.

Take the top three reasons why it could be dangerous and become more conscious of those dangers. This will make people less prone to accidents and injury, Bruce said.

“When people are more aware of the risks they take, they tend to approach the activity with more caution,” said Staff Sgt. Jason De Jesus, 56th FW ground safety technician. “We hope to continue to raise awareness so that Luke Airmen can be safer in their day-to-day activities.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
NEW_1

Luke F-35s visit Columbus AFB

Airman 1st Class Daniel Lile A T-6 Texan II roars overhead as the pilots of two Luke Air Force Base F-35 Lightning IIs prepare to exit their aircraft July 23 at Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi. The pilots are Capt. Nichola...
 
 

Gillespie Loop: Honors Airman who made ultimate sacrifice

BAGRAM AIR FIELD, Afghanistan — The men and women of the 455th Air Expeditionary Wing came together for a road dedication ceremony to honor Master Sgt. Randy Gillespie, a fallen Airman who paid the ultimate sacrifice. Master Sgt. Randy Gillespie was a career fuels specialist who died July 9, 2007, from wounds sustained during small...
 
 

Who’s afraid of a little blood?

I have been in the Air Force for 22 years and have been a medical laboratory technician since the beginning of my career. The medical or clinical laboratory is where specimens are tested to provide information to medical providers who directly assist in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease in patients. After graduating basic...
 

 

Pursue education for career’s sake

Everyone knows education can be a good bullet on an enlisted performance report, but few know the true value of an education in regard to a military career. The pursuit of an education can be just as valuable as the degree acquired at the end. The knowledge acquired in the pursuit of an education can...
 
 
Pg-3--photo-illustration

Candid money talk improves relationship

There are many reasons why people divorce but at the top of the list are lack of communication and finances. That’s why it’s important to combine these two topics to make for a successful long-lasting relationship. “I bel...
 
 

News Briefs July 31, 2015

Total body conditioning class A new total body conditioning class is 6:30 and 9 a.m. Monday and Wednesday. The 6:30 a.m. class is broken into two half hour segments to accommodate squadron or individual physical training. The 9 a.m. class is one hour. The class consists of body weight movements and the use of equipment...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>