Commentary

February 7, 2014

It’s your name on the right!

Master Sgt. SAMUEL SIMIEN
56th Civil Engineer Squadron

As you report in for the day and have an opportunity to read this article, take a look down at your uniform. Something that you should notice on the left side of your chest stitched in blue and placed closest to your heart is the U.S. Air Force tape.

This speaks volumes to the commitment it takes for Airmen to continue our charge of “fly, fight and win!” It takes heart, which is more than just showing up to a duty section. It is the giving of yourself to a purpose bigger than you. However, as you glance toward the right side of your chest, you will see your last name. That’s right, your name.

For most, it’s the name you had as you entered into military service and sworn under oath to defend our nation. It is the name that was called upon in basic military training, when your military training instructor was giving you a butt chewing, teaching you a drill movement, or just handing out your mail. It’s that name that was called many times at many appointments, from technical training to in-processing at your new base. This name is easily found on Alpha rosters, recall rosters, unit manning documents and any other roster you are associated with.

The most important part of this topic here is the fact that your name will travel across the Air Force by means of roll calls, written on documents or more importantly, your character. That’s right, located on the right side of your chest is the most important thing you can own in our great Air Force — your name.

Attached to it are other’s perspectives of your performance, dependability and contributions to the team. From your subordinates, peers, supervisors and others in your leadership chain, your name has your self-created characteristics attached to it. Ask yourself, “Am I wearing my uniform in accordance with Air Force Instruction 36-2903 standards? Am I on time not only to work, but with my work as well? Am I in this for me, or am I developing others along the way? Do I approach my day as a job, or do I accept it as a duty? Am I performing in the manner to just get by, or at a level above standards?”

So as you can see, when you look down on your right side and fix your eyes on your name tape, ask yourself, “What is attached to my name?”




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