Local

February 28, 2014

Planning, scheduling core of MXG mission

140212-F-HT977-005
It usually goes unnoticed when the heart is operating as intended, but let it skip a beat, and even the strongest will take note. Almost the same can be said for plans and scheduling. Overlooked by some, it is the heart of the 56th Maintenance Group.

The 56th MXG plans and scheduling team are the overall managers of the proper scheduling and documentation of the maintenance on the aircraft. Not only do they touch more than one area, they handle flying phases, fuels and engine maintenance along with the 56th Operations Group.

“The plan that we put together affects all of maintenance and operations, and we rely on them to execute it smoothly,” said Master Sgt. Fred Anane, 56th MXG wing plans and scheduling superintendent. “Without plans and scheduling members, the aircraft would have a shorter lifespan and some of the components could fail, resulting in loss of life.”

Plans and scheduling gathers input from both maintainers and pilots, and then piece it together to formulate the weekly, monthly, quarterly and yearly flying schedules, which in turn the maintainers and pilots will have to execute to the best of their ability.

“The 56th Maintenance Operations Squadron depends on the schedule so they can efficiently maintain their aircraft,” said Airman 1st Class Mathew Nauman, 56th MXG aircraft maintenance scheduler.

It is a constant fulfillment of aircraft requirements for the plans and scheduling Airmen, to keep the aircraft serviced while maintaining enough aircraft to fulfill mission requirements. They have a variety of things they must accomplish in a week’s time, from attending production and scheduling meetings, ordering parts, building weekly maintenance and flying schedules, updating long-range plans, and ensuring daily maintenance jobs are completed by the maintainers that are checking aircraft forms to ensure the information is accurate.

“We contribute to the overall mission of the base by providing precise flying schedules, taking into consideration the pilots training timeline and weekly meetings with the operators to support their training,” Anane said. “Without aircraft we can’t train our warfighters, which is the mission here at Luke.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Pg-1-photo-150612-F-EC705-058

Emerald Knights go out with bang

Emerald Knights watch a burning piano during the 308th Fighter Squadron inactivation party June 12 at Luke Air Force Base. The 308th FS and aircraft maintenance unit have packed up and are transitioning to the 314th FS standing...
 
 
2_lemery_d2

Respect — want, earn, give, but don’t lose it

Lt. Col. David Lemery We all want it, some earn it, some are given it and some lose it. Respect can be defined as a feeling of deep admiration for someone or something elicited by their abilities, qualities or achievements. As ...
 
 

Solve problems at lowest level

Crucial in our Air Force environment today is having the proper tools and skillsets available to deal with problems. There is literally something new almost every single day that will invoke problem solving skills. When faced with a problem, an important mindset to have is to resolve the issue at the lowest possible level. Some...
 

 

News Briefs June 26, 2015

607th ACS change of command Lt. Col. Charles Jones will relinquish command of the 607th Air Control Squadron to Lt. Col. Jerald Canny in a ceremony at 8 a.m. Wednesday in Hangar 999.   CMS change of command Maj. Scott Hall will relinquish command of the 56th Component Maintenance Squadron to Maj. Anthony Sutton in...
 
 

Fighting Falcons arrive at Holloman

Courtesy photo Six F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 308th Fighter Squadron at Luke Air Force Base arrive in formation June 16 at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico. The 308th FS has inactivated and the soon to be activated 314th FS assumes the 308th FS mission of training F-16 pilots as a 56th Fighter Wing...
 
 
5_Courtesy-photo

Monsoon season blows in storms, rain, dust

Courtesy photo Arizona is known for being sunny with clear skies for the majority of the year, but every year “it” happens. As the clouds roll in, the sky darkens with thunderbolts streaming overhead, and the first drops of...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>