Events

March 11, 2014

Static Displays Part 2

32-CAP

Civil Air Patrol Cessna 182 Skylane

The Cessna 182 has become one of the most popular aircraft with search and rescue aircrews. In addition to its role as a search and rescue platform, the Skylane is used for orientation flights, transport, and reconnaissance in support of counterdrug and homeland security. Like the C-172 Skyhawk, the Skylane’s high wing configuration is ideal for allowing aircrews to search below the aircraft with no obstructions. New Skylanes entering the fleet are equipped with highly advanced avionic displays sometimes referred to as glass cockpits. The engine package is stronger than the Skyhawks, allowing for a larger operational envelope.

Courtesy of http://epublishing.sercap.us
 
30-C-45

Beechcraft C-45

The Air Corps ordered 11 Beech Model B18S aircraft in late 1939 and designated them C-45. The planes were essentially identical to the civilian version of the aircraft and used by the Army for light transport, staff and liaison missions.

The plane was powered by two Pratt & Whitney Wasp Junior radials and cruised at 211 mph, carrying a maximum of six passengers and crew.

The Air Corps ordered more than 1,300 C-45s with most produced as the C-45F. During the early 1950s, Beech completely rebuilt 900 C-45s for the Air Force. They received new serial numbers and were designated C-45Gs and C-45Hs, remaining in service until 1963 for administrative and light cargo duties.

Courtesy of www.nationalmuseum.af.mil
 
30-C-47

Douglas C-47D Skytrain

Few aircraft are as well known, were so widely used or used as long as the C-47. Affectionately nicknamed the “Gooney Bird,” this aircraft was adapted from the Douglas DC-3 commercial airliner. The U.S. Army Air Corps ordered its first C-47s in 1940, and by the end of World War II, procured a total of 9,348. These C-47s carried personnel and cargo around the globe. They also towed troop-carrying gliders, dropped paratroops into enemy territory, and air evacuated sick or wounded patients. A C-47 could carry 28 passengers, 18-22 fully equipped paratroopers, about 6,000 pounds of cargo or 18 stretchers and three medical personnel.

Courtesy of www.nationalmuseum.af.mil
 
30-B-17G

B-17G “Sentimental Journey”

Needing to fill the Army Air Corps requirement for a long-range, high-altitude, daylight bomber, Boeing developed the then Model 299, powered by four 750hp Pratt & Whitney Hornet engines. When the model crashed after take-off on its second flight, Boeing was technically disqualified from the contract, but Army continued and ordered later models designated YB-17 and YB-17A. By the end of March 1940, the first production batch of B-17Bs was delivered to the Army Air Corps.

The final version, the B-17G model, boasted a heavy defense of 13 .50 caliber Browning machine guns and could carry a bomb load of 8,000 pounds. The B-17G entered service in fall of 1943 and become the most produced model with over 8,600 built.

Considered by most to be the most popular and recognized aircraft of WWII, the B-17 helped win the war in Europe by dropping more than 640,000 tons of bombs.

The B-17 went through many refinements, and had a total of six models that were delivered to the U.S. Army Air Corps.

Courtesy of www.azcaf.org
 
30-B-25_Mitchell

B-25 Mitchell

Named after Gen. Billy Mitchell, the Army Air Corps’ most famous figure of the 1920s and 1930s, the North American TB-25N proved to be one of the best American weapons of World War II. The TB-25N Mitchell, a twin-engine bomber that became standard equipment for the Allied Air Forces in World War II, was perhaps the most versatile aircraft of the war. It became the most heavily armed airplane in the world, was used for high-and low-level bombing, strafing, photo reconnaissance, submarine patrol and even as a fighter. It was distinguished as the aircraft that completed the historic raid over Tokyo in 1942. Subsequently, it saw duty in every combat area being flown by the Dutch, British, Chinese, Russians and Australians in addition to our own U.S. forces. Although the airplane was originally intended for level bombing from medium altitudes, it was used extensively in the Pacific area for bombing Japanese airfields from treetop level and for strafing and skip bombing enemy shipping.

Courtesy of www.azcaf.org




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