Local

March 28, 2014

Avionics Airmen: Troubleshooting mission success

The audio panel allows the pilot to communicate with other aircraft and the control tower.

Have you ever wondered what’s inside an F-16 that makes everything function and who was responsible for fixing those parts when something went wrong?

The answer to that question is the Airmen of the 56th Component Maintenance Squadron Avionics Flight. They are responsible for analyzing various onboard equipment and identifying system malfunctions for maintenance and repair.

“Without us the Air Force would spend a lot of money shipping aircraft parts between depot-level maintenance and flightline maintenance,” said Tech. Sgt. John Brackenbury, 56th CMS Avionics Flight production superintendent. “We are able to screen those parts to find out if they are causing the failures on the jet and if they truly need to go in for a major overhaul or complete rebuild.”

Tech. Sgt. John Brackenbury, 56th CMS Avionics Flight production superintendent, inspects boxes that will be used to stand up the Air Force repair enhancement program. The program will repair otherwise unserviceable equipment in-house, saving the Air Force time and money.

When an aircraft system isn’t working correctly, avionics Airmen troubleshoot the aircraft down to an electronic component, called a line replaceable unit. When they inspect the different fault codes and suspect an LRU to be bad, it is removed and sent to the avionics back shop for more in-depth troubleshooting.

They receive units from supply management Airmen working at the aircraft maintenance units, some come directly from supply management and others from individual shops such as armament. The flight can receive as few as one-to-two units a day or as many as 15.

When equipment can’t be fixed in-house, it is sent out for repair. The flight is in the process of standing up a program that will eliminate having to send parts out for repair, saving the Air Force time and money.

Airman 1st Class Benjamin Hahn, 56th CMS Avionics Flight team leader, troubleshoots a failure on the improved avionics intermediate station. The IAIS is used to identify line replaceable units by simulating signals from an aircraft.

 

Staff Sgt. Eric Zimmerman, 56th Component Maintenance Squadron Avionics Flight team leader, and Tech. Sgt. John Brackenbury, 56th CMS Avionics Flight production superintendent, inventory Air Force repair enhancement program tools and equipment for the program.

“The Air Force repair enhancement program we are standing up will repair otherwise unserviceable equipment and put it back in service,” said Master Sgt. Andrew Wasson, 56th CMS Avionics Flight chief. “We have been outsourcing repairs to contractors in the past, but now we are looking at expanding our capabilities with an actual in-house repair center.”

An interest in aircraft electronics and electrical systems is needed for working in the avionics career field. Airmen must also possess exacting attention-to-detail to ensure the mission is successful.

“To be successful in this job, you need a lot of drive and definitely a lot of passion for your job,” Brackenbury said.
 

Senior Airman Kevin Burns and Staff Sgt. Eric Zimmerman, 56th Component Maintenance Squadron Avionics Flight team leaders, work on removing a communication switch from an audio panel at the avionics flight.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Tech. Sgt. Timothy Boyer

Construction plan supports F-35 program

Tech. Sgt. Timothy Boyer An Australian F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter prepares to launch Aug. 25 at Luke Air Force Base. Luke is scheduled to have 144 F-35s by 2024 with 11 countries training pilots and maintainers here...
 
 
frana_g

The Psychology of Leadership

Lt. Col. Gregory Frana When given the opportunity to lead, how do great leaders ensure people want to follow them? In the military it is sometimes the case that followers simply have to follow, but what makes people “want” ...
 
 

Refuse to fear change

Are you afraid of change? Most people are. Every day we experience change in our lives, and we certainly can’t hide from it. We learn and grow from changes; that’s what makes the world go around. With all of the Air Force and day-to-day life changes, learning to deal with change must be one of...
 

 
3_150818-F-LC301-007

Munition flight’s isolation strengthens unit

Senior Airman Christopher Bolling, 56th Equipment Maintenance Squadron Munitions Flight precision guided missiles bay chief, and Eddie Hutton, 56th EMS Munitions Flight crew member, work on an air-to-air missile. The munitions ...
 
 

IN BRIEF

Stand up for vets The 3rd Annual Stand Up For Veterans event is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 26 at the Glendale Community College Student Union. There will be employment opportunities, social services, legal services, free hair cuts for veterans, free lunch for vets and their families, and more. Vets can apply for healthcare and...
 
 
4_150810-F-LC301-003

Reservist lends hand

Master Sgt. Steven Joubert, 944th Detachment 1, is the first Air Reserve aircrew chief to hold a position within the 309th Aircraft Maintenance Unit since 2007 when the 944th Fighter Wing underwent changes in the base realignme...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>