Local

August 8, 2014

56th Operations Support Squadron forecasts for Luke AFB

Senior Airman MARCY COPELAND
56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Ever curious where that AtHoc notice that flies across the computer screen alerting of weather warnings and when heat index changes comes from?

Credit the people at the 56th Operations Support Squadron weather forecasting and warning services. Their mission is to observe and provide weather forecasts and severe weather threats to more than 30 squadrons and the installation commander, and protect military interests, mission and property ranging in the millions of dollars.

“The weather intelligence that key leadership receives from us can either make or break a mission,” said Master Sgt. Michael Miller, 56th OSS mission weather element NCO-in-charge. “It can postpone, delay or cancel a mission. When I predict a correct forecast and the mission goes as scheduled, there is a great sense of accomplishment. It’s always a good feeling when the mission gets done.”

As easy as it is to summarize what the meteorologists and weather technicians do, the detailed amount of work to be done just to forecast the possibility of a storm striking the base entails knowledge about storm patterns, computer based model systems and weather forecasting equipment.

Some squadrons have to work around the clock tracking weather and running forecast simulations to determine how a particular storm cell may behave. Luke’s weather squadron is not a 24-hour operation since the mission is to train the world’s best fighter pilots, and that usually occurs during the day.

The responsibility of Luke’s weather forecasting and warning services is to monitor any terrestrial weather phenomenon and to provide advanced warnings. In the event of damaging, destructive storms that contain the potential for lightning, hail, damaging winds, or the infamous monsoon dust storms, the 56th OSS weather technicians send out AtHoc notices to alert base personnel of the hazards, potentially saving lives.

“Weather is something that affects you,” said Senior Airman Alexander Lopez, 56th OSS weather forecast technician. “It’s your job. It’s something you are seeing and feeling as it occurs. When dealing with people’s lives and military resources, such as fighter jets, just knowing you got those jets down safely and in time, is a feeling of satisfaction that is hard to describe. Our forecasts can save lives by keeping jets and Airmen out of harm’s way.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Staff Sgt. 
STACI MILLER

CMS aircraft fuel systems provides push for pilot

Staff Sgt.STACI MILLER Airman 1st Class Gary Esposito, 56th Component Maintenance Squadron aircraft fuel systems apprentice, prepares to inspect a 370-gallon external fuel tank on Luke Air Force Base. Esposito inspected the tan...
 
 
Senior Airman 
GRACE LEE

Latest F-35 has fastest induction to ALIS

Senior AirmanGRACE LEE The 14th F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter to arrive at Luke Air Force Base is shown Dec. 5 on the flightline. Airmen at the 61st Aircraft Maintenance Unit worked quickly to get the aircraft ready to...
 
 

Gratitude cultivates exceptional leadership

Several months ago I was inspired by the phrase “cultivate an attitude of gratitude.” The topic was presented in a religious context; however, I found these words significant and profound when considered as a tenent of exceptional leadership. Cultivate is an action verb. The word brings to mind images of an experienced gardener patiently tending...
 

 

Leadership vs. management

Have you ever had a boss or someone that made you want to come to work every day, someone you would do anything for without question? Then you were probably working beside a leader, not a manager. The biggest difference between managers and leaders is the way they motivate people who work for or follow...
 
 

Decking the halls …

Staff Sgt. Timothy Boyer Andrea Mathis, 56th Force Support Squadron Fighter Country Inn accounting clerk, decorates a Christmas tree Dec. 4 in the lobby at the Fighter Country Inn at Luke Air Force Base. Base lodging is available to active-duty service members, retirees and dependents on a space-available basis. For more information, call 623-856-3941.
 
 

Safety begins with asking ‘What could go wrong?’

I’m sure most of us have been told to “be safe” at some point either by a commander, supervisor or even a co-worker. This holiday season will probably not be any different. Someone will use this simple phrase in the next few weeks, and it will feel like a cliché to you, but what does...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin