F-35 night flying

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Air Force photograph by Senior Airman Ridge Shan

A 62nd Fighter Squadron F-35A Lightning II takes off for an evening sortie Oct. 11, 2018, from Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. Pilots conduct periodic, routine night flying in order to train for nighttime and low light operations.
 

Air Force photograph by Senior Airman Ridge Shan

An F-35A Lightning II ascends over the mountains around Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., Oct. 11, 2018. The pilot training courses at Luke include a night flying block which lasts for a few weeks.
 

Air Force photograph by Senior Airman Ridge Shan

An F-35A Lightning II takes off for a nighttime sortie Oct. 11, 2018, over Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. Pilots train to fly during the night using night-vision optics and flight instruments.
 

Air Force photograph by Senior Airman Ridge Shan

A 62nd Fighter Squadron F-35A Lightning II rockets into the sky on full afterburner above Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., Oct. 11, 2018. Fighter pilots practice afterburner take-offs to simulate immediate or emergency air response.
 

Air Force photograph by Senior Airman Ridge Shan

An F-35A Lightning II takes off Oct. 11, 2018 at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. Pilot training courses at Luke include flying under a variety of different conditions, including at night, in order to produce combat-ready Airmen.
 

Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Jacob Wongwai

An F-35A Lightning II fighter jet takes off from Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., Oct. 11, 2018. Night flying training operations are conducted to ensure F-35 pilots can fully operate in a night time setting.
 

Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Jacob Wongwai

An F-35A Lightning II fighter jet flies over Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., Oct. 11, 2018. Luke AFB conducts F-35 night flying training operations to ensure that pilots are trained to their maximum ability.