Air Force

June 1, 2012

Post Attack Reconnaissance training is a must for success

Tags:
Robert J. Kaschak
452 Emergency Management
PAR training
Members for the 452d Air Mobility Wing conduct unexploded ordinance maneuvers during Post Attack Reconnaissance training. During the upcoming Operational Readiness Exercise and Inspection, members will be required to don chemical gear during scenarios that simulate a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and enhanced conventional weapons attack. (U.S. Air Force photo / Staff Sgt. Megan Crusher)

Major efforts are ongoing throughout the 452d Air Mobility Wing, to ensure everyone is prepared for the upcoming Operational Readiness Exercise and inspection. Unit Training Assembly weekends, as well as the week days, are jam-packed with many opportunities for airmen to receive training on the roles they will assume, as the target dates for ORE, ORI and Nuclear Operational Readiness Exercise draw closer.

Emergency Management is currently conducting Post Attack Reconnaissance training. This training is an assorted mix of responsibilities that will be required knowledge for members assigned to Unit Control Center, Facility Management and PAR positions. They will be working together to accomplish the daunting tasks of accountability, reportability and survey operations. While these duties are indicative to what every Airman should know regardless of rank, the training will also focus on actions taken during real-life threat conditions. For example, attendees will be required to don chemical gear during scenarios that simulate a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and enhanced conventional weapons attack.

Post Attack Reconnaissance training will examine the unique requirements of the UCC and FM areas and demonstrate which concepts to apply for activities such as bug-out plans, setting up contaminated waste disposal areas and land mobile radio etiquette. Instruction will also delve into activities involving positioning of M8 stands, grid map reading techniques, first aid in chemical environments and litter carrying. Attendees will learn step-by-step procedures on how to harden facilities and vehicles, reporting unexploded ordnance, covering assets with plastic and initiating plans to move those assets to avoid contamination. The 10 feet to 50 feet rule, marking contamination and incorporation of the Defense Connect Online (allows instant messaging and the ability to see what is happening outside on maps and status boards via the computer) will also be briefed.

Everything we teach is designed to facilitate the communication and recovery process after an attack. Time is of the essence and EM dedicates itself to providing the training you need to do the job quickly and efficiently while minimizing your risk. These skills are crucial to the base recovery process and failure to understand and execute these duties could have a detrimental effect on the expeditious launch of aircraft and mission completion.

It is fair to state that these are the most fundamental responsibilities inherent to the air base recovery process. Personnel assigned these tasks are literally the eyes and ears of the command. Their situational awareness strengthens the command’s ability to ascertain the posture of the installation after an attack. Working in tandem with emergency management personnel and other emergency responders, these warriors scrutinize their areas, up-channels information and report findings back through the chain of command.

Ironically, despite all the technical innovation we have at our disposal, it comes down to the individual effort of all Airman performing these jobs. Their attention to detail, reporting procedures and communication skills cannot be overstated.

Although the wing fared well overall during the 2008 ORI, the PAR area received a marginal rating. Therefore, the March EM technicians are now placing heavier emphasis on this training and are working to ensure personnel who attend the training fully understand and can execute primary tasks with confidence.

In order to ensure all personnel receive training, EM began conducting training sessions approximately six months ago and will continue until the exercise commences. Training sessions are expected to increase as the execute date draws closer and units are able to better ascertain the availability of their people for deployments and exercises.

So, if your supervisor or commander assigns you to PAR duties, don’t feel like you are being punished, rather take it as a compliment that your leadership has placed trust in you to learn these skills and become a vital part of the base recovery process. The PAR team is not for appointees only, it is open to whomever wants to volunteer.

Beyond a doubt, we are a team and your support is paramount to achieve success.

If you have questions, contact EM at 951-655-3024 or stop by for a visit.




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