Air Force

June 15, 2012

What is a Phoenix Raven?

Tags:
by Staff Sgt. Mark Estroga
452 AMW Raven

Tech. Sgt Julio Sandoval (center), acts out a scenario of a mock hostage situation aboard a March Air Reserve Base C-17 Globemaster III, as Senior Master Sgt. Jeffrey Feller (left rear), loadmaster, 701 Combat Operations Squadron, looks on. Sandoval demonstrates proper procedures Ravens are expected to deploy in this type of situation. Ravens are capable of handling aircraft searches, airfield survey techniques, advanced firearms training, embassy operations, explosive ordinance awareness and anti-hijacking duties.

Founded in 1997, the Phoenix Ravens are the elite of the Air Force Security Forces. They deploy to areas where security is deemed inadequate and are the first to set foot off the plane. In order to be considered for membership into the Phoenix Raven program, a person must be serving in the U.S. Air Force Security Forces career field. There is a month-long, 12-hour per day training course conducted at the U.S. Air Force Expeditionary Center at Fort Dix, New Jersey. Prospective Ravens are instructed on various subjects including cross cultural awareness, verbal judo and unarmed self-defense such as “Krav Maga” and ground fighting. Aircraft searches, airfield survey techniques, advanced firearms training, embassy operations, explosive ordinance awareness and anti-hijacking duties are also part of their responsibilities.

A day as a Raven is never a typical day; it can change in a moment’s notice. When a Raven deploys on a mission they travel in teams of two to six personnel, trained and equipped with standard and less conventional weapons. Ravens deploy as aircrew members on Air Mobility Command missions when notified by the AMC Threat Working Group.

The Phoenix Raven mission normally starts with the planning and reviewing of trip reports and field surveys conducted by other Raven teams or intelligence. The information collected aids in logistical planning for downrange operations. Ravens must be prepared for the unexpected. The Raven teams specialize in all matters relating to security, advising aircrews on force protection measures, providing close-in security to detect, deter, and counter terrorist threats to Air Force personnel, property, and assets.

Staff Sgt. Joseph Gross (left) employs defensive techniques by using a baton to deflect Tech. Sgt. Michael Hammer’s (right) aggressive attack. Ravens are trained in various protective disciplines such as verbal judo and unarmed self-defense such as Krav Maga and ground fighting.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. David House

Pacing program embodies Wingman concept

U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. David House Staff Sgt Joey William, 452 Force Support Squadron (right) helps fellow Airmen keep pace during a timed run at the March ARB running track, June 28. William is one of several voluntee...
 
 

Protecting your possessions while on vacation

Somewhere in southern Sicily a man at a remote café sighs, refreshed after a day of climbing hills, thanks to his new black support socks. Opposite him, his wife proudly thrusts her shoulders forward to accentuate her red Yoga T-shirt, even though she has the physique of a woman who loves double ladles of crème...
 
 

Sexual Assault Prevention Innovation Award announced

Defense Department officials today announced the first Sexual Assault Prevention Innovation Award to recognize military and civilian contributions that advance the department’s goals of preventing sexual assault. Core elements of the military’s strategy to prevent sexual assault include the promotion of innovative ideas and enhanced collaboration among the services, officials said. In May, ...
 

 

New clinical recommendations to treat sleep problems

The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) has released new clinical recommendations and support tools to assist in the identification and treatment of a sleep disturbance occurring in patients after a concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The suite of products assists health care providers in the identification of a sleep problem and...
 
 
912-COC

News Briefs July 18, 2014

Change of Command U.S. Air Force photo/1st Lt. Jonathan Wavell Lieutenant Colonel Nathan R. Howard, Commander, 912th Air Refueling Squadron (right), assumes command as he accepts the guidon from Colonel Shawn E. Teagan, Command...
 
 
U.S. Navy Photo/Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist John Harrington

They took a brave path to the United States

U.S. Navy Photo/Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist John Harrington Jimmy Truong (sitting) and Vien Do escaped from Vietnam and found their way to the U.S. before eventually landing Information Technology jobs at the AFN...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin