Health & Safety

July 6, 2012

Running clinic drills participants

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by Staff Sgt. Megan Crusher
452 AMW public affairs
452 runners practice
452 Air Mobility Wing members practice a running drill, where runners lunge into the air as they run; it's one of many drills taught to help increase an individual's ability to run more efficiently, during the second running clinic hosted by March FITT, inside and outside Hangar 452, June 23. The first running clinic, held last June was such a success, Ian Adamson, director of research and education, Newton Running, was invited back to continue helping Airmen improve their running technique and extending their running life. U.S. Air Force photo / Staff Sgt. Megan Crusher

March FITT exposed Team March members to techniques that will effectively improve running ability and reduce risk of injury, during the Natural Form Running Clinic, held in Hangar 452, June 23.

Ian Adamson, director of research and education, Newton Running, instructed the two, three hours sessions and stressed the importance of efficient running through good posture, athletic position and placement.

“It’s so important that people learn how to run properly because it will extend their running life and it effects other sports as well, because everything is running,” said Chief Master Sgt. Terry Luzader, 4th Air Force aviation resource functional manager.

Adamson explained how American culture alters its natural running style because of the elevated heel in modern running shoes. To emphasize the difference, he had individuals participate in several running drills, including barefoot running so they were able to experience natural running and suggested folks continue the drills to help them transition back to that style.

Brig. Gen. Karl McGregor, commander, 452d Air Mobility Wing, encouraged attendees to pay attention and practice what was being taught because he incorporated the methods into his training while deployed and improved his running with no injury.

Staff Sgt. Mark Bramble, unit deployment manager, 452d AMW, was so excited about program he brought his family, because the running clinic from last year had such a profound effect on him.

“I have worked my way up to over 30 miles per week, injury free thanks to the techniques that I learned,” said Bramble.

Capt. Adam Walker, pilot, 336th Air Refueling Squadron, is another natural running enthusiast who, prior to last year’s clinic, had only run six miles at one time. Just in the last year, he has run five full marathons and five half marathons while employing the techniques taught during the running clinic.

Adamson has been teaching at other Air Force bases for the last three years and said people have been very receptive and given positive feedback. One of the major things he wants people to know is they should be able to have a conversation while training.

“Most people don’t understand when they are training, they have to train at a relatively low heart rate to get the aerobic development, said Adamson. “Otherwise, you’re limiting your ability to run any distance beyond sprinting.”

It may seem slow for many at first, but with practice, speed will increase as people build their aerobic development.

Plans are already in the works to conduct the running clinic twice a year and Luzader is hopeful the next one will be scheduled sometime in October.

Ian Adamson, director of research and education, Newton Running, demonstrates a running drill, where runners lunge into the air as they run; it’s one of many drills taught to help increase an individual’s ability to run more efficiently, during the second running clinic hosted by March FITT, inside and outside Hangar 452, June 23. The first running clinic, held last June was such a success, Adamson was invited back to continue helping Airmen improve their running technique and extending their running life. U.S. Air Force photo / Staff Sgt. Megan Crusher




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