Local

August 10, 2012

Mahaney assumes command of 452nd Air Mobility Wing

Tags:
by Master Sgt. Linda Welz
452 AMW public affairs
CoC1
Col. Samuel C. Mahaney, right, commander, 452nd Air Mobility Wing, takes the wing flag from Major General Mark A. Kyle, left, commander, 4th Air Force. The flag symbolizes the transfer of authority from the old to the new commander. Command Chief Master Sgt. Ericka E. Kelly, wing command chief, assisted with the flag transfer. (U.S. Air Force photo / Senior Airman Isis Ponce)

Col. Samuel C. Mahaney assumed command of the 452nd Air Mobility Wing, March Air Reserve Base, Calif., Sunday, Aug. 5, at Hanger 2306.

The 4th Air Force commander, Maj. Gen. Mark Kyle, officiated the ceremony, addressing the wing at his home base for the first time since he took command of the numbered Air Force in March 2011.

Kyle spoke about the challenges he’s heard from other wing commanders. He said one commander told him that his unit would “bury the 452nd in performance, in accolades, in fun, in purpose and in mission.” Another said his unit was going to “kick the living bejeezus out of the 452nd.”

“I had to laugh. I thought that was funny,” Kyle said. “I kinda like that. We’ll foster a little competition, some comaraderie.”

Kyle said what really makes him happy is that he has begun to bring leaders together in 4AF who are serious about getting the job done. Kyle said Mahaney is a force, a rock star that gets it done and understands it.

“He’s about people, mission and performance, in that order,” Kyle said. “He is here to serve. First the Air Force, then the Air Force Reserve Command and then the 452nd. There is no better man in the Air Force Reserve Command for this base, at this time, today than Bo Mahaney.”

Once Mahaney accepted command of the wing, he wasted no time in addressing the challenges from other units.

“I consider this to be the premier wing in the Air Force Reserve Command,” he said. “By listening to you, I can learn if there’s something that has come in between our troops and the mission. There’s nothing more important to me than seeing you succeed; to make sure that you have everything you need to succeed. You may have heard people say that before. I’ll stand behind those words and you can hold me to it,” Mahaney said.

A self-proclaimed practical joker, Mahaney has made 17 moves with his family and said his wife-of-29-years, Chris, the love of his life.

“She still lights up my world like the very first day that I convinced her to marry down,” he said, adding that she is just as committed to the wing as he is. “You’re going to see a lot of her.”

Mahaney said he is the type of commander who likes to walk around and visit his troops, so don’t be surprised when he walks up to you one day to see what might need fixing, he said.

“There are always some things that need fixing and we’ll work on those together. One might ask how I’ll identify those things. I’ll know that by asking you,” Mahaney said.

When people around the Air Force talk about March ARB, they talk about a wing that gets the job done. This is the largest wing in the command, and is referred to by others as the Go-to-Wing.  A name of this stature carries a price, Mahaney said.

“It means that at any given moment, hundreds of us are deployed around the world. At any time, I can get that phone call saying that one of our own had been hurt or worse. You serve your country and still find time to spend with family. You live your life for this,” Mahaney said. “Your training and readiness requirements are the same as active duty, yet you find a way to accomplish them in addition to your civilian jobs.  You are ready to go anywhere, anytime, in 72 hours.  That’s a big deal! That’s why I ‘m here for you.  I know what sacrifice you all are making and I know what I need to do for you because of what you are doing for our nation.”

Mahaney said his philosophy is two-fold. First, take care of the people and they’ll take care of the mission.
“If you come in here and you do your job but you don’t get paid, we’re not taking care of you. If you call up and you try to make billeting reservations so you can stay here for a UTA and you have a lot of hassle with that, I’m not taking care of you,” he said. “So I need to hear about those things and we’ll make sure they are all taken care of.”

Second, he believes in a culture of feedback.

“Some of you have already experienced this. I’ve spent time with the Advisory Council and the Rising Six,” he said. “I’ll spend time with anybody and everybody who wants me to lend them my ear. Let me know what’s going on and we’ll make sure we get it fixed.”

The commander said his bottom line is to fix it if it’s broken, change the process if it is flawed, get an exception to policy and then change the policy if needed and rewrite bad regulations.

“So, if you’re standing there thinking, ‘Gosh, we can’t do that because the law says we can’t,’ but it’s something we ought to be doing, let me know. We’ll get it changed.”

Col. Samuel C. Mahaney, on stage-right, took command of the 452nd Air Mobility Wing, March Air Reserve Base, Calif., Aug 4. Airmen assigned to the Base Honor Guard present arms during the base change of command ceremony. (U.S. Air Force photo / Senior Airman Isis Ponce)




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
   
 

 
square

‘Retired Air Force Reservist finds inspiration through loss’ addendum

Angela Alexander was a member of the 56th Aerial Port Squadron, March Air Reserve Base and on annual tour in Japan when she was notified that her family had been in a severe car crash. She was told her husband, Suri and two dau...
 
 

Alcohol: how much is too much?

Alcohol is a part of the American culture — civilian and military. Many of us drink with others to socialize and celebrate important events. Or we sometimes drink alone to relax and unwind from a hard day at work. But along with the good times and good feelings associated with alcohol, there are well-known health...
 
 
BC3---women-in-combatswuare

AF begins testing phase for women in combat roles

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Marionne T. Mangrum Cpl. Daisy Romero (left) and Sgt. Jessica Dmoningo, assigned to a female engagement team (FET), speak with an Afghan man in his compound during a patrol in Marjah, Helmand pro...
 

 
U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Ashley J. Thum

Ten ways to help kids conquer military life challenges

U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Ashley J. Thum Capt. Adam Luber, a 334th Fighter Squadron pilot, and Jeremiah Seaberry, the 334th FS pilot for a day, watch F-15E Strike Eagles on the flightline during a 4th Fighter Wing Pilo...
 
 
BC4---wildfire

922nd Civil Engineer Flight, small unit, worldwide impact

U.S. Air Force photo/Capt. Jason Saberin Members of the Army’s Northwest Division Field Engineer Support Team join the 922nd Civil Engineer Flight’s Staff Augmentation Team (S-Team) at March Air Reserve Base, Calif., Feb. 2...
 
 

AF sexual assault prevention: moving in the right direction

“I was raised in a household where you take responsibility for your own actions and don’t blame others for your downfalls,” said Tech. Sgt. Kathleen Thorburn. “Instead of seeing a crime that had occurred, all I could see were my mistakes. Why did I go to that party? Why did I accept the drink? Why...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin