DoD

August 24, 2012

Dempsey: Transition in military uncomfortable, but necessary

Tags:
by Claudette Roulo
American Forces Press Service
120816-D-VO565-003
Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, conducts a town hall with members of the Minnesota National Guard in Rosemount, MN, Aug. 16, 2012. DOD photo by D. Myles Cullen

WASHINGTON D.C. – Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, conducted a town hall meeting with members of the Minnesota National Guard in Rosemount, Minn., Aug. 16.

The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said, the military must undergo three transitions in the coming years, with each dependent on finding the best way forward in lean economic times.

During the meeting, Dempsey told guardsmen that the best way to transform the military isn’t just about what’s best for the armed forces, but “really about figuring out what’s best for the country” in the years ahead.

“What does the nation need in 2020?” Dempsey asked. “How do we build that capability? How do we deliver in a way that’s affordable for the nation?”

“We’re all citizens first,” he said. “Therefore, I think we’ve got to figure out how to help the country through that economic challenge while preserving the military that it needs.”

Dempsey highlighted his three transitions.

First, he said, is to move from a military that is generally focused on deploying for combat into one that can perform missions besides counterinsurgency.

Service members of his generation were criticized as being “stuck in a Cold War mentality,” Dempsey said.

“It was a challenge, I will admit to you,” he said, “for us to change the way we looked at problems from that Cold War paradigm into the counterinsurgency paradigm.”

“I would submit to you that those of you that have done nothing but counterinsurgency are going to have exactly the same challenge, when looking back at other kinds of warfare,” he said.

But that’s exactly what service members must do, Dempsey said. “Not because we think it’s on … the horizon, but it could be someday and you can’t wait until it’s there to get ready for it.”

The second transition is economic, he said and involves managing a shift from the “largely unconstrained budgets of the last ten years — ‘if you needed it you got it’ — to something that is going to be more constrained.”

That might make service members uncomfortable, the chairman said, but the military has an obligation to become more affordable to the country. “Why? Because national power … is actually the aggregate of three things, not just the military,” Dempsey said. “It is the military, but it’s also economic well-being and it’s also diplomatic influence.”

The last transition is the drawdown of military members. Over the next five to six years, the Army and Marines will reduce in size by about 120,000 people in total, he continued.

“We owe it to those young men and women who have served so honorably and so well to make sure we take care of them,” Dempsey said.

“In all of that we’ve got to keep faith with our military family,” he said, adding that family includes veterans, wounded warriors and the parents and spouses of service members killed in action.

One way to keep faith as the Defense Department draws down is to guarantee that resources continue to be dedicated to family support programs, Dempsey said.

“The challenge of course, is we’ve got 1,000 flowers blooming out there,” he said. “We’ve got to make sure that we can identify the ones that are most important and ensure we continue to resource those.”

“The second way we keep faith is by pay, compensation, healthcare and retirement,” the chairman added.

Finally, he said, keeping faith with the military family means providing the toughest training possible. “I’m not keeping faith with you if I resource all that other stuff and I don’t train you,” he explained, “because then, I send you off to war and you’re not ready for it.”

“Change is always uncomfortable,” Dempsey said, “but often if we’re agile enough, the change can actually make things better for us and improve relationships, not disrupt them.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
photo courtesy/U.S. Central Command

Development course builds leadership skills for reserve officers

photo courtesy/U.S. Central Command The 20th annual International Junior Officer Leadership Development Course (IJOLD) took place at Karup Air Base, Denmark, where officers from seven countries participated in events to develop...
 
 

March Air Reserve Base Child Care Program

March Air Reserve Base offers the Home Community Care (HCC) Program to the Air Force Reserve (AFR) and the Air National Guard (ANG) members during the primary Unit Training Assembly (UTA) drill weekends. March has four HCC program providers who are state licensed child care providers. Care may also be requested to use during a...
 
 
Press Enterprise photo/Stan Lim

Air traffic controllers spreading their wings in new tower

Press Enterprise photo/Stan Lim Frank Giuchici, one of the air traffic controllers at March Air Reserve Base, peers out on the flight line while monitoring military and civilian planes from the new control tower at the base. Ma...
 

 
back-to-school_LearningTools[1]

This school year, raise grades with online learning tools

photo courtesy/StatePoint Media Unfortunately, the pace of classroom learning can’t be tailored to every student’s individual needs — particularly these days, as class sizes are growing and funding for special enrichm...
 
 

News Briefs August 1, 2014

ID CARD SERVICES The combined (Reserve/Guard) ID Office, located in bldg. 2314 (third building from the main gate) provides ID card services by appointment Monday – Friday between the hours of 8 a.m. – 3 p.m. Customers can make appointments through the DEERS appointment website at https://rapids-appointments.dmdc.osd.mil or by calling 951-655-3028. Walk-in hours are from...
 
 
Untitled-1

AAFES marks 119 years of serving Airmen

Today, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES) celebrates 119 years of proudly serving Airmen, Soldiers and their families. AAFES is the 43rd largest retail organization in the U.S., with annual revenue of more than ...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin