Veterans

August 24, 2012

Mystery solved: Secrets to building a strong resume

by Talia Wesley
Career coach and job developer

(This article is the second of a three part series on how to compose an effective resume.)

Giving employers what they want is the next step in the resume-building process. As a general rule of thumb, include a maximum of 10 years worth of work experience in your resume. Different jobs warrant different skill sets, so the ultimate goal is to present oneself as the best possible candidate for the position. Always look to the information given in the job description for guidance.

In addition to resume content, remember to include military service records like your DD214 (discharge documents) and DD 2586 (Verification of Military Experience and Training). These documents add more substance to your resume. Also, do not forget to mention the following additional information:

  • Overseas experience: indicates mobility and adaptability
  • Level of security clearance: indicates completion of background check
  • Foreign language skills: language, written or verbal level of fluency
  • Awards and Decorations: indicators of leadership and success
  • Annual performance reports: documented work efforts
  • Soft and hard skills: leadership and project management (respectively)

Educational background is an essential part of your resume. Summarize your educational achievements (colleges attended, locations, graduation dates, certificates, academic majors, minors, and course concentrations) and post them on the bottom, or after your achievements if you have a degree.

Employers are drawn to specialized training that easily associates with the sought-after position. Include all specialized training you have received from your last employer which is transferable to your new job target. If you have not attended college, definitely include all specialized training in your target field, even if the training lasted a few hours or just one day. Hiring managers generally prefer to see some post-secondary education.

Honors and awards are great ways of expressing the important achievements and recognitions earned while working for past employers. Your resume is a subjective representation of your skills and abilities. An award or honor is the proof of your success and adds solid objectivity to your resume. Your achievements should be listed throughout the resume. However, if you want to draw special attention toward these achievements, you should definitely list them in the Awards and Honors section and combine it with the Achievement section located on the top portion in your resume.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Untitled-1

Seven little known facts about Memorial Day

As Americans get ready to observe Memorial Day with travel, family get-togethers and celebrations, let us not forget—it’s not about the BBQ. Memorial Day is observed specifically to remember those who gave the ultimate sacr...
 
 

Increased mission requirements open doors for continued military service

WASHINGTON (AFNS) — The Air Force is introducing several personnel and manpower initiatives to meet increased mission requirements outlined in the fiscal year 2016 President’s Budget. In order to enhance operational and mission capacity in support of combatant commanders, and to maintain readiness, the Air Force is setting a minimum active-duty force level of 317,000...
 
 
Natl-Better-Hearing-and-Speech-Month

Knowing signs of hearing loss, speech disorder are vital to well-being

May is Better Hearing and Speech Month, where we seek to raise awareness about communication disorders and learning how to recognize their signs. Below are things you should know, from the American Speech and Language Hearing A...
 

 

Quarterly Awards: best of the best highlighted

Airman of the Quarter: Senior Airman Dominique Acuna, integrated flight control specialist, 452nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron.   NCO of the Quarter: Tech. Sgt. Ruben Davis, mental health craftsman, 752nd Medical Squadron.   SNCO of the Quarter: Master Sgt. Christopher Jugas, non-commissioned officer in charge of training, 452nd Security Forces Squadron.
 
 
DoD
AFN photo/Charlie Gill

Robert Sekula, man of many hats

AFN photo/Charlie Gill Robert Sekula, a broadcast journalist/producer working at the American Forces Network Broadcast Center, one of March Air Reserve Base’s mission partners, wears many hats. Robert Sekula’s ever-present ...
 
 
U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Kevin Mitterholzer

Recruits swear in at Military Appreciation Night

U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Kevin Mitterholzer Lt. Col. Erin Meinders, commander, 362nd Recruiting Squadron, swears in 13 new recruits to the Air Force Reserve, during the Inland Empire 66ers Military Appreciation Night ...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin