Air Force

March 1, 2013

AF implements enlisted date of separation rollback

by Debbie Gildea
Air Force Personnel Center public affairs

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas — The Air Force will implement the enlisted date of separation rollback program this fiscal year, in addition to several voluntary force management programs that were announced early in Feb., Air Force Personnel Center officials said.

The rollback will accelerate the date of separation for senior master sergeants and below, who meet required criteria, said Lt. Col. Shelley Strong, AFPC operations division chief. Airmen affected must separate from the Air Force by May 31, and those eligible to retire must do so, effective June 1 or earlier.

The rollback program allows commanders to consider Airmen for selective reenlistment early, if they meet program criteria.

Airman can be considered for the DOS rollback only if they:

  • Have fewer than 14 years of total active federal military service as of May 31, 2013, or 20 years or more Total Active Federal Military Service on or before May 31, 2013, and
  • Have a May 31, 2013 or later DOS, and
  • Have one of the reporting identifiers, reenlistment eligibility codes, assignment eligibility codes or grade status reasons defined in the program commander action table.

Identifiers or codes that require separation are established when a second term or career Airman refuses to secure or declines retainability for training, retraining, or professional military education. Also, when an Airman waiting for retraining is disqualified for cause, awaiting discharge, separating or retiring for cause and other similar circumstances, Strong said.

Airmen eligible for retirement may also be affected by the DOS rollback.

“It’s important that retirement-eligible members affected by the program submit their retirement request by Mar. 29, this year,” Strong said. “Enlisted retirement is not automatic, so affected members who don’t submit their request by Mar. 29, will be projected for separation instead.”

Airmen separated under DOS rollback won’t be required to return unearned portions of bonuses, special pays, or other monetary incentives and will not be entitled to any unpaid portions of bonuses, special pays, or other monetary incentives.

If they meet Post-9/11 GI Bill eligibility requirements and are honorably discharged, involuntary separation will not affect their benefits. However, members who transferred education benefits to their dependents, who do not complete their related active duty service commitment, may be required to repay those benefits.

Airmen with six or more, but less than 20 years of active service, who are not in their initial term of enlistment, may be authorized one-half separation pay, but will be required to sign an Individual Ready Reserve Agreement to receive that benefit.

In addition, Airmen who served 180 days or more on active duty, who are separated under the DOS rollback, will be authorized transition assistance benefits, such as permissive temporary duty, 180 days extended medical care for themselves and their family members and two years of commissary and exchange privileges.

For more information about force management programs and other personnel issues, visit the myPers website at https://mypers.af.mil.




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