Health & Safety

June 14, 2013

The physiological effects of leisure

Senior Airman Noelle E. Reyes
452 Aeromedical Staging Squadron Mental health technician

If you’re looking for just another reason to take a break, here it is!

According to a 2009 study conducted by the Official Journal of the American Academy of Neurology, participation in regular leisure activities can help to prevent cognitive decline and reduce the risk factors of dementia and Alzheimer’s. Just as studying or working requires mental flexibility and strength, leisure activities such as vacationing, playing games, or participating in hobbies can help to exercise the more creative side of the brain. People tend to forget that it is equally important to stimulate the left and right side of the brain and the easiest way to accomplish this is to do some of your favorite things!

Going on vacation gives your logical right side a break and allows you to exercise and expand your creative ability and memory. In the five-year long study conducted by The neurology journal’s publication department of researchers, an incredible 89% of people over the age of 55 showed increased or sustained cognitive ability, with the regular addition of leisure into their daily activities. These personal activities included reading, dancing, watching television, listening to music and more. The 11% that revealed a decline in their thinking ability and memory were consistently people with lower education, of blue-collar occupation, smokers, frequent drinkers and possessed medical conditions.

It is best to consider your leisure activities as a means to mental stimulation, activity and exercise. Neurological researchers revealed, “the cognitive activities, but not physical or social activities, had a protective effect against cognitive decline because of mental stimulation (a positive effect) and not just being [physically] active. Clearly, this study suggests that, like exercising your muscles to stay healthy, the brain does better with more activity.” Taking care of your brain’s health may be simpler and easier than you think. Do things you enjoy often and just consider it a part of your brain’s own regular physical training schedule.

Helpful Resources:

http://www.neurology.org/content/66/6/E21.full




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Evaluating detox diets: Do they actually work?

When it comes to detox diets, women are a prime target for marketers, who promise a wide range of health benefits including increased energy, focus and immune function. Weight loss claims are also made for some detox plans. Yet these diets are not scientifically proven to be effective. The basic idea is that detox diets...
 
 

‘Lucky 13’ tips for a safe and happy Halloween

Whether you’re goblin or ghoul, vampire or witch, poor costume choices—including decorative contact lenses and flammable costumes—and face paint allergies can haunt you long after Halloween if they cause injury. Enjoy a safe and happy Halloween by following the “lucky 13” guidelines from FDA, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the Centers for Disease Control...
 
 

UltimateMe to help military families get healthier

The President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition (PCFSN) is working with the Sharecare team to support the launch of UltimateMe, a secure, personalized online wellness platform to help members of the military community assess, manage and improve their health and performance. The new platform expands the access to wellness programs and resources for service members and...
 

 
Halloween-Safety

Halloween safety tips for 2014

Here are a few safety tips from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission can protect children who plan to go trick-or-treating this Halloween. Costume Designs: Purchase or make costumes that are light and bright enough to be...
 
 

Cyber expansions create security considerations

WASHINGTON (AFNS) — Technological advances have put the world at the fingertips of anyone with connection to the Internet and during cyber security awareness month, Airmen and their families are reminded to remain vigilant when posting personal information. “You have to assume that everyone is looking at it,” said Col. Mary Hanson, the senior information...
 
 

Increasing skirt sizes may hike your breast cancer risk

If you want to minimize your chances of developing breast cancer, staying the same skirt size over the years might help, a new study suggests. “Our study has shown that an increase of one size every 10 years between 25 and postmenopausal age [over 60] is associated with an increase of breast cancer [risk] in...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin