Air Force

August 16, 2013

Leaders discuss roles of reserve components

Col. Bob Thompson
Air Force Reserve Public Affairs

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Continuing to perform an operational role, while solving manpower costs and dealing with shrinking defense budgets highlighted topics discussed at the Reserve Officers Association 2013 National Security Symposium.

More than 300 people attended the conference Aug. 7-10 at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Washington, D.C. They included senior leaders from the Department of Defense and its reserve components.

“There’s lots of talk on operational verses strategic reserve,” said Lt. Gen. James F. Jackson, chief of Air Force Reserve and commander of Air Force Reserve Command. “Each service is a bit different, but for the Air Force, it is crucial we have ‘Tier One’ readiness.”

Tier One readiness means being ready to go immediately by keeping the Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard trained to the same standards as the Regular Air Force.

Speed is the decisive factor when crisis erupts, said Jackson during a panel discussion with his fellow reserve component chiefs.

During a “State of the Air Force Reserve” briefing, Maj. Gen. Richard S. Haddad, deputy to the chief of Air Force Reserve at the Pentagon, discussed a new organization expected to have “synergistic benefits that will pay huge dividends” for national defense.

“Earlier this year the newly created Air Force Special Operations Air Warfare Center stood up at Duke [Field, Fla.],” said Haddad. “This center brings together more than 500 active-duty and reserve Airmen for the special operations mission.”

He added that the Air Force Reserve is planning to add five more “associate units” where reservists share equipment and facilities with active-duty Airmen in the growing fields of cyberspace, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance.

As the defense budget continues to streamline and officials look for new ways to save money, talk often goes to merging the Guard and Reserve.

“It’s now more important than ever that those in the D.C. beltway understand there is a difference between the Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve,” said Haddad. “We are all brothers and sisters in arms… but we need to remind people there are differences.”

The Air Force Reserve is a federal Title 10 force, always at the service of the president and secretary of defense. The Air National Guard maintains dual status, day-to-day serving in Title 32 at the service of a state’s governor. Guardsmen serve under a Title 10 or federal status only when mobilized or as a volunteer with the consent of their state leadership.

Haddad outlined the history of merger attempts in 1948, 1964 and 2003 and how the past proposals were not able to successfully save money and cover the requirements for a ready-now federal reserve and support the governor-controlled state militias.

“So the talk of the Guard assimilating the Reserve or the Reserve assimilating the Guard likely isn’t within political reality,” said Haddad. “Better integration needs to be a focus of our efforts.”

“Today’s debate should be centered on how to best capitalize on our strengths and core competencies to improve the Total Force team,” said Jackson. “We’re optimistic about the future, and we’re working hard to shape the Air Force for the future fight in 2023.”

Jackson affirmed that federal laws such as Title 10 USC 12304(a) guarantee the Air Force Reserve is accessible for homeland support during national emergencies and natural disasters. Also, Title 10 USC 12304(b) provides combatant commanders and department of defense planners a way to incorporate cost-effective reservists into their reoccurring steady-state plans.

Both laws were enacted in the 2012 National Defense Authorization Act. The laws support today’s “Operational Reserve” being critical to the daily operations of the U.S. military at home and around the world.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Joseph Dangidang

Airman retires after 37 years of service

U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Joseph Dangidang Chief Master Sgt. Karen L. Krause, 452nd Maintenance Operations Squadrons superintendent, receives a flag from a Blue Eagles Total Force Honor Guard member during her retireme...
 
 

Look past 1947 for Air Force roots

The Air Force officially turns 67 this month, but my Uncle Gino thinks it’s older. He’s 90 and the lone surviving brother of my father. Both of them served in World War II, as did two of their siblings. My father was in the Navy, as was his eldest brother, Europeo (his real name, I...
 
 
Courtesy Photo

Pilots earned top honor for WW II actions

Courtesy Photo First Lt. Donald J. Gott and 2nd Lt. William E. Metzger Jr. of the 452nd Bombardment Group, were killed when their heavily damaged B-17 Flying Fortress exploded Nov. 9, 1944, as they raced to friendly territory i...
 

 

A reminder of our 24/7/365 responsibility to ourselves and each other

All Airmen have a responsibility that last much longer than a one-month campaign. This responsibility extends beyond ourselves and includes our work environment, our families, friends, fellow Airmen and our communities. While Suicide Prevention Month is observed across the United States in September, the month-long event is a reminder of everyone’s 24/7, 365-day responsibility to...
 
 
HBI-Web-Graphic

Online risk assessment offers ways to evaluate, improve health

How well do you know yourself? Poor health is not always obvious. Even people who appear healthy can be at risk for medical conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes. The Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) Health Risk ...
 
 

Life is all about choices

Back when I lived in the rural Midwest, late September and October was harvest time for the farming communities. For many frantic weeks, farmers would be out in the fields from morning to night, trying to beat the first snowfall, gathering in the crops they had planted earlier that spring. In southwest Minnesota the harvest...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin