Air Force

October 4, 2013

Chaplain’s Corner

Senior Airman Sarah Dyroff
452 AMW chaplain assistant

The brain is an amazing and wonderful thing. You don’t have to be a scientist or doctor to understand how complex and intricate it is. It seems that the more discoveries and research we as humans have made regarding all that funny mass in between our ears, the more questions we still have about it! Yes, the brain is quite a fantastic thing.

The brain plays so many roles in how our bodies function, but there is one major role that I wanted to discuss in particular; our thoughts. Every day, our minds bring in so much data from what we see or hear, touch, taste or smell. I can go on quite a lengthy tangent, even, about how our five senses may even be invaded against our will from so many advertisements and media that surround our everyday, modern lives.

Take a moment to consider this: our brains take in a LOT of information, and as a result, we have the task of filtering a mass variety of thoughts. My question is, are these thoughts often positive, or negative?

I know that in my personal experience, I’ve been prone to harbor and even nurture more negative thoughts than positive. Sure, I could blame unwanted sources from media, or things that others say or do, but in the end, I am the one filtering the thoughts. If the thought was negative, I probably did one of two things: either kept the negative thought at the forefront of my mind, indulging in the negativity itself, or try to stuff it into the back of my mind, where it would fester like a disease. Either way, the result was dismal, to say the least.

Now, does this mean that every negative thought entering your mind isn’t legitimate? Of course not. Bad things happen to us, or to others, and we have feelings that are angry or sad. It’s good to be honest about those feelings. However, if we don’t have enough positive thoughts to counteract the negative ones, we put our well-being at risk.

If you’ve been battling negative thoughts like myself and many of us have, try this with me: pay attention to the thoughts that enter your mind. Take charge of them. If they are negative, think of something positive! I know it may seem silly at times, but it really works. We can’t help what people around us say or do, but we can help our thoughts. Recognize the negative ones for what they are – negative – and even if it doesn’t relate to the negative thought, tell yourself something positive anyway. Encourage these positive thoughts and grow them like a garden in your brain. The more you do it, the stronger you will be!




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