Air Force

October 25, 2013

Get1Now allows reservists to build future, reap rewards

The Get1Now program, an incentive program managed by the Air Force Reserve Command Recruiting Service, rewards current Airmen for referring qualified candidates to a recruiter. One of the key benefits of the program is that it allows Citizen Airmen to play a direct role in deciding who will make up the future of the Air Force Reserve.

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. — Reservists can help the Air Force Reserve find candidates for the next generation of Citizen Airmen and receive rewards and recognition at the same time through the Get1Now program.

Managed by the Air Force Reserve Command Recruiting Service, the program encourages reservists to recommend the people they know – friends, family and acquaintances – for military service in the reserve force.

In return for their referrals, reservists receive accolades from Air Force Reserve leadership, earn reward prizes and acquire top-notch content for their performance reports and award nominations.

Another significant benefit of the program is being able to pick one’s fellow Airmen.

Master Sgt. John Sims, 932nd Security Forces Squadron at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., is no stranger to handpicking his own co-workers through the Get1Now program. When faced with standing-up a Reserve unit from scratch in 2010, he relied on his local in-service recruiter and his network of former active-duty colleagues to fill the ranks.

Through the Get1Now program, Sims was able to refer more than a dozen future reservists, all of whom carried his personal seal of approval.

“I wanted to make sure we got the correct Airmen to do the job,” he said, and apparently he has succeeded because three years have passed, and when his squadron assembles for training, much of the backbone of his unit is made up of Airmen he referred.

Another Get1Now advocate is Staff Sgt. Allancia Sorhaindo, a financial management technician with the 315th Airlift Wing at of Joint Base Charleston, S.C.

From 2010 to 2011, Sorhaindo referred 15 candidates who would go on to wear Air Force blue. Among them were an older sister and several close friends. Sorhaindo said she is fortunate to have friends and family who serve alongside her in the same wing because they can relate to one another both personally and professionally.

“My friends and I were close before they joined,” she said. “But now we’re more like family.”

Sorhaindo’s contributions to the Get1Now program also provided her a career boost.

Not only did the Reserve Command Recruiting Service present her an Achievement Medal for being the program’s top contributor in 2010, but her accomplishments became key components of a nomination package that led to her earning the Air Force Reserve Command’s Financial Management Airman of the Year for 2010.

Other hard-charging Airmen, like Sorhaindo, who aim to leverage Get1Now contributions into a career boost can rest assured they have senior leadership’s support. They only need to look straight to the top of the Reserve chain of command.

As part of a Get1Now promotional video Chief of the Air Force Reserve Lt. Gen. James Jackson endorsed the program and said, “Let’s work together to find the next generation of Citizen Airmen for your unit, the Air Force Reserve and our country.”

Jackson’s endorsement goes further. Those Airmen who refer multiple new reservists will receive letters of recognition signed by AFRC senior leaders, up to and including Jackson himself.

If the chance to build the future of the Air Force Reserve, while receiving a career boost and senior leadership recognition, isn’t enough to motivate reservists to contribute to the Get1Now program, there is one final incentive – a variety of reward prizes. While some of the prizes have mass appeal, many are more specific to military culture, such as flag boxes and coin holders.

All of these incentives are a small price to pay for the Reserve Recruiting Service because the Get1Now program is a powerhouse when it comes to turning citizens into Citizen Airmen.

The program’s effectiveness is based on the fact that a potential recruit who has been recommended by a Reserve Airman is approximately 10 times more likely to enlist than one who walks into a recruiting office off the street.

Col. Steven Fulaytar, commander of the Reserve Recruiting Service, said most Airmen know which of their friends, family and colleagues would make good Airmen.

“Think about it,” he said. “Who better to find the next cyber or intel Airman than a current cyber or intel Airman?”

Interested Airman can visit www.get1now.us for more information.




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