Health & Safety

November 1, 2013

Army Focuses on Wellness to prevent injuries, illnesses

The Army Medical Command aims to minimize illnesses and injuries and strengthen its force by shifting focus to prevention, Army Surgeon General Patricia Horoho said at the annual meeting of the Association of the U.S. Army in Washington D.C., on Oct. 21.

“We are … focused on improving the readiness and resilience of our soldiers and their family members,” she said.

The Army launched its new Ready and Resilient campaign in March. The effort focuses on providing beneficiaries with easy access to medical, nutritional, fitness and mental health services at all Army installations and bases. Each of these services will be integrated into a soldier’s education, training and daily life to help them deal with adversity and adapt to change while growing and learning from setbacks.

Upon entering the service, a soldier undergoes physical and mental assessments and learns how to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Mental health also is important. Service members will be taught tools to help them handle difficult situations such as mental exercises and breathing techniques. In addition, they will undergo mental health assessments pre- and post-deployment to screen for problems. Giving beneficiaries the care and resources they need to bounce back helps build resiliency within the Army.

The Army’s new Performance Triad is part of the Ready and Resilient campaign. This approach emphasizes the importance of getting at least 150 minutes per week of activity, consistently eating healthy meals and snacks, and getting seven to eight hours of sleep a night.

Horoho spoke at the annual meeting again the following day. She noted that around 75 percent of Americans do not meet the fitness requirements to be in the Army, and many die from preventable illnesses.

She provided a “prescription for health” to audience members, written out on a prescription pad, that included daily activity in the morning and afternoon, eating calories rather than drinking them, limiting caffeine to the morning, removing all electronics and blinking lights from the bedroom, and getting seven uninterrupted hours of sleep.

By changing behaviors of soldiers, families and veterans, the Army hopes to create a more resilient force that works as a supportive entity and can bounce back from any difficulty.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

‘Final Rule’ offers broader mental health care coverage

WASHINGTON – TRICARE military health plan beneficiaries will now have access to both TRICARE-certified mental health counselors and supervised mental health counselors, a Defense Health Agency (DHA) official said here today. In an interview with DOD News, Dr. John Davison, DHA’s behavioral health branch chief, said the so-called “Final Rule,” published yesterday, will go into...
 
 

Gluten-free diet won’t make you thin

What runs through your mind when you see the words “gluten-free” plastered on your favorite bag of chips in the store? Do you wonder if something inside the bag has changed? “Gluten-free” products are filling the market now that the diet has become popular. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, oats and barley....
 
 

Military Health System introduces telehealth projects

Technology advances, particularly the use of telemedicine, continue to change how Americans receive their healthcare, where they receive their healthcare and the organizational models for managing their healthcare. The Military Health System long has been a pioneer in using telehealth to connect our global force with the most well-trained specialists in our system. Whether it’s...
 

 
U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. David House

Pacing program embodies Wingman concept

U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. David House Staff Sgt Joey William, 452 Force Support Squadron (right) helps fellow Airmen keep pace during a timed run at the March ARB running track, June 28. William is one of several voluntee...
 
 

Sexual Assault Prevention Innovation Award announced

Defense Department officials today announced the first Sexual Assault Prevention Innovation Award to recognize military and civilian contributions that advance the department’s goals of preventing sexual assault. Core elements of the military’s strategy to prevent sexual assault include the promotion of innovative ideas and enhanced collaboration among the services, officials said. In May, ...
 
 

New clinical recommendations to treat sleep problems

The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) has released new clinical recommendations and support tools to assist in the identification and treatment of a sleep disturbance occurring in patients after a concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The suite of products assists health care providers in the identification of a sleep problem and...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin