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August 22, 2014

New Joint Deployment Center coming to March

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Senior Airman Russell S. McMillan
452 AMW public affairs

Gary McDaniel (left), architect, 452nd Civil Engineer Squadron, reviews the blueprints for the new Joint Deployment Center with Brandon Talbot, mechanical engineer, 452 CES, on Aug. 1, 2014. The JDC will replace the existing deployment facility and will feature a larger deployment bay, more stringent building seismic protection, security upgrades and energy efficiency characteristics aligning with Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design silver certification standards. The JDC is scheduled to begin construction within the next six months and is slated to finish within two years.

A new Joint Deployment Center capable of housing passengers and cargo is scheduled to begin construction within the next six months here.

Funded by the 2014 Military Construction and Veterans Affairs appropriations bill, the approximately $20 million building will provide additional capabilities for March Air Reserve Base to support global operations.

The JDC will incorporate many upgraded features such as seismic protection in the event an earthquake would occur, a high-volume bay to accommodate additional personnel and enhanced security that meets Anti-Terrorism/Force Protection standards, said Gary McDaniel, architect, 452nd Civil Engineer Squadron, March ARB.

Additional cosmetic and modern enhancements include ample electrical outlets for mobile devices and equipment, artwork that is precisely affixed and angled to dampen noise, and energy efficient structural upgrades to meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design silver certification, said Brandon Talbot, mechanical engineer, 452 CES.

“We’re in an era of cell phones and computers,” said McDaniel. “This deployment center will have electrical hookups in the bay areas for the troops to recharge their phones before they deploy.”

The location of the new JDC is slated to replace the existing deployment facility. The entire program has been progressing for approximately ten years, and one building has already been demolished in preparation for the construction, noted Talbot.

“The initial request was identified and reviewed by civil engineering, for the building, to decide if a renovation was needed,” said McDaniel.

After an initial estimate was provided and various approvals were incorporated, such as how to include the historical significance of the building and its environmental impact, it was routed and then approved by Congress, added McDaniel.

The current step in the process, known as the dust off, lasts roughly six months to address any possibly changes or issues that may have arisen from the date of approval to actual construction.

“We look at the plans and review everything that was previously designed to make sure it’s up to current code standards,” said McDaniel.

“If we can catch things in design, it’s much less expensive than catching it in construction,” added Talbot. “Mil-Con [Military Construction] is very tightly regulated.”

Once the dust off process is complete, a bid package is communicated to the public and an evaluation board reviews the bids and awards the contract. Construction of the JDC is scheduled to take up to one and a half years to complete.




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