Health & Safety

March 24, 2012

Biometrics strengthen Nellis entry control

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Senior Airman Jack Sanders
U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brett Clashman
Paris Garrett, TW and Company security officer, scans identification cards using a biometric identification sensor at the Main Gate, March 20, 2012 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Nellis is introducing a new security program, the Defense Biometric Identification System, to manage personnel, property and installation access.

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev .– Nellis Air Force base is introducing a new security program for base access, the Defense Biometric Identification System.

DBIDS is a Homeland Security and Department of Defense initiative to manage personnel, property and installation access.

The program, originally developed at Korean bases, is now used worldwide. The latest version of the system was installed at Nellis as of Feb. 27. The installation began a test phase Mar. 5, and use of the system began this week.

Since it has been in place Nellis’ Security Forces have confiscated more than 20 lost/stolen ID cards and prevented one barred individual from entering the base.

“This security system was designed to manage access to DOD installations by using bar codes and finger-print biometric technology and has been in use by Air Force installations overseas since 2003,” said Senior Master Sgt.  Jeffrey Tibble, 99th Security Forces Group. “More than 180 Air Force and sister service installations are currently using DBIDS.”

The most recent update to DBIDs allows for automatic updating and enrollment.

“The new DBIDS 4.0 system does not require the manual entry of data from every person entering the installation like previous DBIDS versions,” Tibble said. “The system will recognize Common Access Cards, Teslin cards and DBIDS created cards and personnel scanned at any of the installation entry control points will be automatically registered once their ID card is initially scanned.  Since the new system does not require manual data entry, long lines to register for the system are avoided.”

Military members, dependents and retirees will have a very quick and smooth registration process since they can be enrolled right from their cars when they enter the installation,” he said. “Initial registration should take no longer than five to eight seconds, which is the average time installation gates guards take to visually check an ID card.  After someone has been initially registered at the gate the scanning of their cards is typically taking two to three seconds. This also decreases the wait time for many contractors who still must register manually at Nellis’ Pass and Registration Office.”

“DBIDS will notify guards about lost or stolen ID cards, individuals barred from base, or persons who are being sought by their commander for an emergency or key response notification,” Tibble said. “The moment ID cards are reported stolen, or people expected to enter gates who require notification or detention, the information can be flagged in the system, instantly alerting guards.”

More updates to the DBIDS are expected in the future, but should merge seamlessly into the current program, Tibble said.

“DBIDS will result in a significant improvement in force protection by adding a degree of automation to our entry control process,” Tibble said.




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