Health & Safety

June 1, 2012

Five ways you can prevent deadly skin cancer

By Shari Lopatin
TriWest Healthcare Alliance

Yes, it’s true—skin cancer is the most common cancer in the U.S.

That means more people get skin cancer than breast cancer, lung cancer and colon cancer. And while not all forms of skin cancer are deadly, they can disfigure your skin and cause much discomfort.

Melanoma: Watch out for it!

Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer. That’s because it affects skin cells called melanocytes, which add color to your skin and hair. Melanoma can spread very quickly to other tissues in your body, which is why it’s deadly.

A government study published recently showed that while most common cancers are declining, cases of melanoma are increasing. Experts attribute this rise to the use of tanning beds, which is very dangerous to the skin.

For best results, you need to detect and treat melanoma as early as possible—and avoid tanning beds altogether.

Prevent cancer with these five tips:

  • Everyone knows to wear sunscreen. But beyond that, leave it to the Centers for Disease Control and   Prevention to offer the best tips for preventing skin cancer!
  • Seek shade, especially during midday hours
  • Wear clothing to protect exposed skin
  • Sport a hat to shade the face, head, ears and neck
  • Wear sunglasses that block both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays
  • Avoid indoor tanning

For more healthy living tips, follow TriWest on Facebook or Twitter: Facebook.com/TriWest and Twitter.com/TriWest.




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