Health & Safety

August 17, 2012

I’ve been profiled, now what?

Tags:
By 99th Medical Group


courtesy photo

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. (Editor’s Note: Special information courtesy of the 99th Medical Group Medical Standards Management Element) — Getting a profile exempting a person from one or more part of the fitness assessment is different than a profile that limits a person from doing certain things at work, and knowing the difference in the process can save service members unnecessary aggravation down the road.

A profile, or an Air Force Form 422A , or Duty Limiting Condition, Air Force Form 469, are the medical forms that serve as a recommendation from a primary care manager to the commander regarding a service member’s ability to perform daily duties while dealing with a temporary medical condition.

Every profile goes through a thorough review process by medical standards experts before being sent to the unit. This review ensures the best and most appropriate duty limitations are communicated to the patient and his or her commander and is mandated by Air Force instructions 48-123 Medical Examinations and Standards. The forms will be processed as they are received and generally take three to four duty days, depending on the case.

The process starts with the service member’s provider. Once the provider has initiated and signed the AF From 469, the medical standards management element performs an administrative review. When the review is finished, the form goes to the profiling officer, a physician, who reviews it to ensure the appropriate profiling has taken place.

Once signed by the profiling officer, an electronic copy is sent to the service member’s commander and his or her designees. The commander then considers the information on the duty-limiting condition form and approves or disapproves it. Once the commander has taken action on, the service member should receive a copy. All mobility restricting AF From 469s require commander’s approval and signature.

An AF Form 469 affecting a member’s ability to accomplish a fitness assessment requires an AF Form 422A. This form is not automatically generated. According to Air Force Regulation 10-203, TITLE OF AFI, the service member is responsible for notifying his or her supervisor and unit fitness program manager when placed on a duty-limiting profile.

The UFPM will coordinate with the Health and Wellness Center to initiate the AF Form 422A. Once the profile is initiated, it undergoes a similar review process as the AF Form 469. Service members can get their completed 422A from at https://asims.afms.mil/imr/MyIMR.aspx.

For more information on the process, call the medical standards management element at 653-3351.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
square

Luke Lightning strikes at Nellis

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Thomas Spangler An F-35A Lightning II assigned to the 61st Fighter Squadron, Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., taxis to the runway for a training exercise at Nellis AFB, Nev., April 15. Maintaine...
 
 

CSAF discusses Air Force’s need to reset

WASHINGTON — The Air Force Association hosted its monthly Air Force breakfast with Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III in Arlington, Virginia April 2. During his speech, Welsh addressed many topics and issues in today’s Air Force, including hitting the “reset button.” “For the last couple of years what we have...
 
 

Ten seconds later, that picture still exists

RAMSTEIN AIR BASE, Germany — There is a conversation many teenagers have had with their parents or friends, me included. “Hey, don’t worry! It’ll be fine; all of the pictures I send disappear after 10 seconds. That’s how Snapchat works.” While many teenagers only share their silly, cross-eyed, quadruple-chinned faces with friends, there are a...
 

 

Becoming stronger through failure

ELLSWORTH AIR FORCE BASE, S.D. — Failing the Air Force physical training test was my greatest fear since joining the military. It is embarrassing to admit recently that fear came to fruition, but what I have learned through that failure has become one of my greatest strengths. After failing, I definitely felt like a weak...
 
 

‘Eye’ see you

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mikaley Towle Lisa Winkelman, 99th Aerospace Medicine Squadron optometry technician, simulates taking a vision test at the Optometry Clinic on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., April 15. Getting an eye exam is important to ensure eye vision and pressure is good and in the normal range. For...
 
 

Nellis AFB goes green for Earth Day

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. — The first Earth Day occurred April 22, 1970, and was introduced by U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin. More than 20 million people and thousands of local schools and communities participated in the first Earth Day in the U.S. Across the Air Force today, installations are taking aggressive strides...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin