Health & Safety

November 30, 2012

Energy drink survey comes to Nellis AFB

Tags:
Major Nicholas Milazzo
60th Medical Group


NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. — There is an ongoing study on the prevalence of energy drink consumption among all Air Force personnel, including civilians, stationed at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. The survey was initiated by investigators at Travis Air Force Base, Calif. in September to understand how many Air Force personnel consume energy drinks, the side effects that are experienced, and the reasons people choose to drink them. After gaining approval from the Air Force Survey Office, 11 other sites have been invited to join the research efforts, with Nellis being one of the selected bases. The survey will run for four weeks at each site, with the study collection period concluding at the end of the year.

Energy drinks are widely used in the military, although little is known about the physical effects on the body. The Air Force Times published an article in June 2012 regarding a two-year research project currently underway at David Grant USAF Medical Center, Travis Air Force Base, Calif. The study is specifically looking at the effects of energy drinks on the blood pressure and heart rate/rhythm of users.

While the U.S. Food and Drug Administration limits the amount of caffeine in sodas and other beverages to no more than 71mg per 12-oz can, there are no such restrictions on energy drinks since they are classified as nutritional supplements. This is particularly concerning to medical providers, since some energy drinks contain up to 500mg per container. Most people consume them for the positive effects of increased mental alertness, energy and stamina. However, excessive amounts of caffeine can cause insomnia, irritability, anxiety, headaches and increased heartbeat.

In October of this year, the family of a 14 year-old girl sued the makers of one particular energy drink for wrongful death. After consuming two 24-oz containers in 24 hours, the girl lost consciousness and later died from cardiac arrhythmia; rapid, slow, or irregular heart rate, due to caffeine toxicity. Although there have not been any reports of deaths attributed to energy drinks in the military, the limited knowledge about their physical effects and how many Air Force personnel consume them is a potential health risk.

A previous research study in 2008 found consumption rates of energy drinks to be 61 percent of all active duty members surveyed at one Air Force base. A more recent study in 2012 at Travis AFB indicated that consumption rates were 87 percent for active duty members, with 40 percent consuming at least one drink per week. Consumption among non-active duty members at Travis was 61 percent. These findings raise more questions about why the more recent consumption rates are higher, and why active duty members consume energy drinks at higher rates than non-active duty members. Your participation in this survey may help provide answers to these questions.

To take the survey online, go to www.nellis.af.mil and open the story “Energy drink survey comes to Nellis’, and click on the ‘related link’ portion which says ‘click here to take the survey’.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mikaley Towle

LRS fuels Nellis’ mission success

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mikaley Towle Staff Sgt. Mike Radcliff, U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron crew chief, and Airman 1st Class Patrick Fields, 99th Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels mobile distribu...
 
 
U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Adarius Petty

Creech heats up

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Adarius Petty The Nellis-Creech Fire Emergency Services Flight’s Fire Station 6 personnel applaud the speaker during the Fire Station 6 ribbon cutting ceremony at Creech Air Force Base, N...
 
 

Aviation pioneer in Las Vegas

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. — During World War II, aviation opportunities literally exploded as the military trained hundreds of thousands of individuals to fly, opening the door to many who might never have had the chance before. Among this group were women pilots, many of whom trained and flew as civil service pilots with...
 

 

Rosie the Riveter and me

WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE, Mo. — As we recognize Women’s History Month this March, I am struck by the thought that heroes and role models do not have to be one single person but, in fact, can be several people. For me, this truth is especially relevant. During World War II, many women opted to...
 
 
DT1-(10)

Ground broken for new solar array at Nellis Air Force Base

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Thomas Spangler Col. Richard Boutwell, 99th Air Base Wing commander, speaks at a ground breaking ceremony for a new solar array at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., March 24. The new array will ...
 
 
Photo courtesy of retired Master Sgt. Phillip Sisneros

Darkest before dawn: Retired master sergeant, active duty wife share struggle of overcoming TBI

Photo courtesy of retired Master Sgt. Phillip Sisneros Then Master Sgt. Phillip Sisneros, 99th Communications Squadron comm focal point chief, lays in a coma following a motorcycle accident in Las Vegas on Aug. 13, 2011. Sisner...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin