Air Force

December 7, 2012

OTS shortens course length, increases efficiency

(AFNS) — (Editor’s Note: To read comments by Airmen on this article, go to www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123328586)

Beginning in January, the Air Force Officer Training School’s Basic Officer Training course will be shortened by three weeks, officials announced Dec. 4.

Cutting the course from 12 weeks to nine weeks was the result of finding efficiencies in the course’s scheduling processes and curriculum, said the OTS commandant.

“Our staff was able to adapt its operations and curriculum in several innovative ways to save money and Airmen’s time while still producing fully qualified and capable second lieutenants,” said Col. Thomas Coglitore. “We’ve also beefed up our total force academics in order for our trainees to better understand the cultures between the active, Reserve and Air National Guard components.”

The commandant said, shortening the course falls in line with Air Education and Training Command’s cost-conscious culture initiative, or C3, which challenges AETC units to seek more efficient ways of using available resources.

“By developing and delivering qualified second lieutenants in a new way, we preserve our resources,” he said.

Coglitore said estimated savings of about $1.9 million may be gained from the change.

“There is a potential for much larger savings as the result of the decreased course length and an increase in the number of classes offered annually by allowing for a more efficient training pipeline flow,” he said.

In fiscal 2012, OTS officials graduated 642 second lieutenants from its basic officer training course and are expected to graduate 1,055 new officers in fiscal 2013. BOT graduates both active-duty and Reserve line officers. OTS’s officer production numbers fluctuate in response to variations between projected and actual Air Force Academy and Air Force ROTC accessions and Air Force end-strength requirements.

“If we get hit with a national emergency and need to commission more officers quickly, OTS gives our nation the surge capacity to do it, and this new construct increases our maximum capability,” said Coglitore.

The syllabus is now pared down to the minimum necessary to fulfill federal commissioning standards.

“There are 116 tasks directed by Air Force instructions to commission someone as an officer and 10 more from the Joint Chiefs of Staff,” he said. “I am comfortable that we are not lowering standards, but becoming more efficient with how we schedule and conduct the training.”

Producing motivated officers of character who embody the American warrior ethos and are culturally aware, expeditionary minded and prepared to lead is the mission of OTS. Blending those principals with the culture of cost consciousness in today’s Air Force assures the future of air power, said Col. Scott Wiggins, OTS vice commandant.

“When things have been done a certain way for a long time, and while tradition is important, sometimes you have to weigh tradition versus progress,” he said. “We always need to be willing to ask why do we do something a certain way and how can we do it better.”

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Charles Larkin Sr.

First sergeant provides health, welfare for warriors

U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Charles Larkin Sr. Master Sgt. Phelipe Salinas speaks to his athletes during the 2014 Warrior Games at the Garry Berry Stadium in Colorado Springs, Colo., Oct. 2. Salinas is the first sergean...
 
 

Safeguarding, re-evaluating your digital footprint

SAN ANTONIO, Texas — Social media is a great resource for Airmen and their families to share information and stay connected to relatives at home and abroad. Although many depend on these wonderful tools, recent events have encouraged us to re-evaluate our digital footprint to ensure our personal and professional information is protected from online...
 
 

October is Energy Action Month: ‘I am Air Force Energy’

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. — Summer has come to a close, and we’re all looking forward to more tolerable temperatures in the coming weeks. Even better news — this means your power bill is likely to go down. But if you think you pay a lot for energy, imagine paying Nellis’ bill of approximately $1 million...
 

 

Taming ‘tyranny of urgent’

VANCE AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. — Many Airmen lead incredibly busy lives, full of unfinished tasks that we often wish we had more hours in the day to fit it all in, and in our professional lives, budgets remain tight, the Air Force is shrinking, and we are challenged to do more with less. Yet...
 
 
U.S. Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Rachel Loftis

Armory: A home for weapons

U.S. Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Rachel Loftis Senior Airman Jaime Romo, 99th Security Forces Squadron armorer, puts a M-240 rifle away after clearing the weapon at the 99th SFS armory at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev...
 
 
U.S. Air Force photo

Nellis Open House brings history to life

U.S. Air Force photo The AT-6 Texan, which was originally flown in 1935 and flown here in the 1940s, will be one of many aircraft at the Nellis Air Force Base Open House on Nov. 8 and 9. It is a single-engine advanced trainer a...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin