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March 1, 2013

Nellis veterinary clinic does more than you think

Cassidy McClain, Veterinary Tech, comforts Eliot Thompson, a Jack Russell Terrier mix, while Dr. Michael Simpson, Veterinary Medical Officer, administers a pre-anesthetic at the Nellis Veterinary Treatment Facility Feb. 20 at Nellis Air Force Base Nev. Eliot is receiving the pre-anesthetic to ease the transition of the anesthesia before being treated for a tooth infection.

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. — Pets aren’t just animals but an extension of the family to most people. Whenever a family member gets sick, the rest make sure that member is taken care of by offering the best medical care possible.

Why would our pets be any different?

Few service members and their families know that Nellis has its own veterinary clinic that is able to provide the care needed for their pet’s health concerns.

Spaying, neutering and mass removal are just the tip of the surgical procedures the Nellis Veterinary Treatment Facility has available to its patients.

According to Capt. (Dr.) Amanda Smith, Nellis Veterinary Treatment Facility Officer in Charge, the clinic treats an average of 30 pets for preventative treatments a day. Dr. Michael Simpson, Department of Army Civilian Veterinary Medical Officer, said they have the ability to provide all sorts of surgical services, but focus on preventive care in order to avoid any unnecessary procedures. Preventive care includes wellness checks, annual exams and sick appointments.

Since Nellis’ clinic does not provide services for profit, it is routinely cheaper than those located off base. This gives customers a chance to focus on what is best for their pets and less on what’s affordable.

“My favorite thing about working for this particular clinic is that since we are not a profit clinic, we are able to provide a lot of services for a really low cost,” Smith said. “This clinic can help a lot of owners do what they need to do for their pets that they might not otherwise be able to afford.”

Another service provided at the clinic is microchipping and pet registration.

Dr. Simpson suggests having your pet microchipped not only because it’s inexpensive, but can save your pet’s life.

“I know from my experience at a shelter, that is too common that people’s pets are put to sleep simply because they can’t be reunited with their owners after being lost, a problem that can be fixed simply with an inexpensive microchip,” Simpson said. “It is simple and convenient to get your pet microchipped during your scheduled visit.”

The clinic treats mostly dogs and cats but can sometimes support smaller mammals such as rabbits, hamsters and guinea pigs. They also provide yearly services to the horses located at the Nellis stables.

Because of the treatment facility’s close interaction with military members it has a unique understanding of basic military procedures. This knowledge helps when preparing family pets for a Permanent Change of Station.

“PCSing with a pet is a pretty complex procedure depending on where you’re going,” Smith said. “People bringing their pets here will have a huge benefit because we do all the medical preparations for the move.”

The clinic focuses on the well-being of its customer’s pets and will do what’s needed to keep them active and healthy.

“Preventing suffering and reducing problems is really the hallmark of what we do here,” Simpson said.

With caring hands and professionalism the Nellis Veterinary Treatment Facility combines a variety of veterinary procedures and military understanding in order to provide the best service possible for its customers.

The clinic requires appointments for any visit that is not an emergency. For more information contact the clinic at (702) 652-8836.




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