Health & Safety

April 26, 2013

Child abuse prevention: Make community a better place

99th Medical Operations Squadron Family Advocacy

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. — April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. This month, and the remainder of the year, family advocacy encourages everyone to play their part in making our community a better place for children and families.

Informed, unified families and communities can enhance our children’s social and emotional well-being and help eradicate child abuse and neglect.
Abuse has many consequences that reach far beyond the immediate trauma and turmoil.

Victims of child abuse can have related problems in adulthood. According to “The Child Abuse Crisis: The Disintegration of Marriage, Family, and the American Community” by P. Fagan, W. Fitzgerald Sr. and D. Hanks, children of abusive parents are 50 percent more likely to abuse substances and six times more likely to commit suicide. Research has also indicated that sons of violent fathers are 10 times more likely to use violence against their wives or girlfriends.

The effects of abuse and neglect are tragic, but with proper treatment and support they can be overcome.

Raising children in a safe and loving environment requires selfless effort. Parents need knowledge, skills and resources to properly and effectively care for their children.

These include:

  • Nurturing and attachment
  • Knowledge of parenting and child development
  • Resilience
  • Social connections
  • Support for parents
  • Social and emotional well-being

“April is a time to address the role that we all play in protecting children, everyone needs to participate,” said Capt. Steven Fisher, 99th Medical Operations Squadron officer in charge of family advocacy. “We can focus on building the protective factors when we are in contact with children and their families. Together, our community can work towards the prevention of child abuse and neglect.”

The Family Advocacy Office and Mental Health Services can offer support and training. Family Advocacy has free classes in Anger and Stress Management, Parenting, and Couples Communication, and staff can be reached at (702) 653-3880 for more information.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

‘Eye’ see you

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mikaley Towle Lisa Winkelman, 99th Aerospace Medicine Squadron optometry technician, simulates taking a vision test at the Optometry Clinic on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., April 15. Getting an eye exam is important to ensure eye vision and pressure is good and in the normal range. For...
 
 

Pharmacy provides exceptional patient care

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. — With a high operation tempo base like Nellis AFB, the satellite pharmacy here is working hard to provide exceptional patient care to the active duty, Reserve, guard, civilian and retiree population. With construction currently underway at the main outpatient pharmacy at the Mike O’Callaghan Federal Medical Center, most of...
 
 
doctor

Ask the Doc

Q: I’m an active duty service member about to start terminal leave. How do I get health care? A: How you get care when you’re on terminal leave depends on whether you have a military or primary care manager. Before going on...
 

 
doctor

Ask the Doc

Q: How far back can my same-sex spouse file a medical claim?     A: Once your spouse shows as eligible for benefits in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System or DEERS, he or she can file claims for care received:...
 
 
Sports

Fitness: Isolating triceps

Airman 1st Class Chad Glass, 99th Security Forces Squadron entry controller trainee, performs a triceps pushdown with a rope at the Warrior Fitness Center on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., March 31. Although this exercise emphasi...
 
 

Ask the Doc

Q: What’s a transitional survivor? A: Spouses and children are “transitional survivors” for the first three years after their active duty sponsor dies. During this time, they’re covered as active duty family members and their health plan options and costs don’t change. After three years, coverage for children doesn’t change — they’re covered as active...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin