Local

October 11, 2013

Pest Management controls plant, insect, bird populace

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Christopher Tam

Senior Airman Jason Urquiola, 99th Civil Engineering Squadron pest management journeyman, prepares to spray insecticide outside the pest management building Oct. 8 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Insecticide is used to exterminate and prevent bees and wasps around the base from becoming over populated.

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Christopher Tam

Staff Sgt. Jonathan Crespillo, 99th Civil Engineering Squadron pest management craftsman, lays bread into a pigeon trap on the roof of the pest management building Oct. 2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Once a pigeon is caught, pest management Airmen will relocate it to a less populated area. Pest management Airmen use the Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard program to control bird population on the installation and reduce aircraft damage. Currently, the 99th CES pest management office is the largest in the Air Force.

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Staff Sgt. Jonathan Crespillo, 99th Civil Engineer Squadron pest management craftsman, prepares to shoot a pellet rifle near Bldg. 1037, Oct. 2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Pest management uses the Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard program to reduce potential bird strikes around the flightline and to prevent foreign object damage to aircraft flying at Nellis AFB.

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Matthew Lancaster

Airman 1st Class Steven Kaham, 99th Civil Engineer Squadron pest management journeyman, sprays a tree near Bldg. 1037 with a wood bearing ant and bee pesticide Oct 2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Controlling bee nests in trees near buildings can be difficult and hazardous. Pest management is equipped to deal with bees when control is warranted to prevent people from getting stung.

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Christopher Tam

Senior Airman Jason Urquiola, 99th Civil Engineering Squadron pest management journeyman, measures chemicals for insecticide inside the pest management building Oct. 2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Insecticide is used to exterminate and prevent ant and roach infestation around the base.

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Christopher Tam

Senior Airman Jason Urquiola, 99th Civil Engineering Squadron pest management journeyman, sprays herbicide outside of the pest management Oct. 2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Herbicide is widely on the Nellis AFB flightline to kill weeds growing in between the cracks on the runway.

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Christopher Tam

Airman 1st Class David Dion, 99th Civil Engineering Squadron pest management journeyman, pours herbicide into a tank outside of the pest management building Oct. 2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Herbicide is a pesticide used to kill weeds and other unwanted plants. The xeriscape or dry-scape [a water-wise landscaping] at Nellis AFB has weeds grow in between rocks and regular spraying controls and eliminates the growth.

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Christopher Tam

Airman 1st Class Steven Kaham (left), Senior Airman Jason Urquiola (middle), and Airman 1st Class David Dion (right), 99th Civil Engineering Squadron pest management journeymen, inventory the pest management supply room at Bldg. 1037 Oct. 2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Pest management has approximately 200 members Air Force-wide, and their mission is to ensure an environmentally sound and effective programs are present to prevent pests and disease vectors from adversely affecting Department of Defense operations.

U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Matthew Lancaster

Senior Airman Jason Urquiola, 99th Civil Engineer Squadron pest management journeyman, sprays insecticide along the wall of the pest management building Oct. 2 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Pest management spray insecticide inside and outside of buildings on base as needed.




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